Levels of etonogestrel lower in obese women after implant

August 1, 2012
Levels of etonogestrel lower in obese women after implant
Obese women who receive a contraceptive implant have lower drug levels in the six months following implant insertion compared with normal-weight women, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

(HealthDay) -- Obese women who receive a contraceptive implant have lower drug levels in the six months following implant insertion compared with normal-weight women, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Sara Mornar, D.O., from the University of Chicago, and colleagues assessed the pharmacokinetics of an etonogestrel in 13 obese African-American women (body mass index of 30 kg/m² or greater) and four normal-weight white women (body mass index of less than 25 kg/m²). After insertion, plasma etonogestrel levels were measured every 50 hours, though 300 hours, then at three months and six months.

The researchers found that etonogestrel levels were consistently lower in the and 31 to 63 percent lower than the normal-weight women, though the differences did not reach statistical significance. Peak plasma levels were achieved at 150 hours post insertion. There were no serious adverse events and obese women rated the implant as highly acceptable.

"Obese women have lower plasma etonogestrel concentration than normal-weight women in the first six months after ," Mornar and colleagues write. "These findings should not be interpreted as decreased contraceptive effectiveness without additional considerations."

Explore further: Contraceptives work well in obese women, but hormone levels lower

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