Nothing fishy about fish oil fortified nutrition bars

September 25, 2012

In today's fast-paced society, consumers often reach for nutrition bars when looking for a healthy on-the-go snack. A new study in the September issue of the Journal of Food Science published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) found that partially replacing canola oil with fish oil in nutrition bars can provide the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids without affecting the taste.

Producers have been hesitant to incorporate into foods because it tends to give off a fishy taste or smell, therefore requiring additional processing steps to eliminate these unwanted qualities. In the study, four levels of fish oil were evaluated to determine consumer acceptance of fish-oil fortified nutrition bars. The results showed that oat and soy-based nutrition bars fortified with the lowest replacement level (20 percent) of fish oil did not affect or purchase intent.

Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil are known to lower triglyceride levels and may help with rheumatoid arthritis.

Explore further: Food scientists fortify goat cheese with fish oil to deliver healthy omega-3 fatty acids

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