US reports incidents of tainted ricotta cheese

September 13, 2012

(AP)—U.S. health officials say imported Italian ricotta cheese tainted with listeria bacteria is linked to 14 illnesses including at least one death.

The ricotta salata distributed by Forever Cheese Inc. of New York is linked to illnesses in 11 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, according to the . Forever Cheese issued a recall of one lot—800 wheels of ricotta salata, or roughly 4,800 pounds (2,177 kilograms)—on Monday.

Jeff DiMeo of Forever Cheese said the recalled Frescolina brand ricotta salata cheese is from one batch manufactured in Italy's Puglia region but would not name the Italian company that manufactured it. The confirmed listeria was present in an uncut sample of cheese from that batch.

Ricotta salata is a salty, white cheese made from pasteurized sheep's milk. It is not the same as soft ricotta cheese sold in tubs and used to make lasagna.

Listeria is rare but deadlier than well-known pathogens such as salmonella and E. coli. It is most dangerous to pregnant women, the elderly and others with compromised immune systems.

It was not immediately clear how many deaths were caused by the . The CDC said listeriosis contributed to "at least one" of two deaths in New York and Nebraska but did not elaborate. A spokeswoman for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Wednesday the department was investigating a death linked to the listeria and a spokeswoman for the Nebraska Department of Health said the same strain had contributed to the death of a woman in her 80s.

A third deceased person in Minnesota was infected with listeriosis linked to the cheese but that was not thought to be the primary cause of the person's death, a spokesman for the Minnesota Department of Health said.

Explore further: 21 deaths now linked to listeria in cantaloupe

shares

Related Stories

21 deaths now linked to listeria in cantaloupe

October 7, 2011
(AP) -- Federal health authorities say a nationwide outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe is now responsible for 21 deaths and the number may continue to grow.

CDC reports 4 dead in cantaloupe listeria outbreak

September 20, 2011
(AP) -- Four people have died in an outbreak of listeria traced to Colorado cantaloupes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday.

Cantaloupe illnesses and deaths expected to rise

September 29, 2011
(AP) -- Federal health officials said Wednesday more illnesses and possibly more deaths may be linked to an outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe in coming weeks.

Cantaloupe outbreak is deadliest in a decade

September 28, 2011
(AP) -- Health officials say as many as 16 people have died from possible listeria illnesses traced to Colorado cantaloupes, the deadliest food outbreak in more than a decade.

Recommended for you

Could insufficient sleep be adding centimeters to your waistline?

July 27, 2017
Adults in the UK who have poor sleep patterns are more likely to be overweight and obese and have poorer metabolic health, according to a new study.

Sugar not so sweet for mental health

July 27, 2017
Sugar may be bad not only for your teeth and your waistline, but also your mental health, claimed a study Thursday that was met with scepticism by other experts.

Vitamin E-deficient embryos are cognitively impaired even after diet improves

July 27, 2017
Zebrafish deficient in vitamin E produce offspring beset by behavioral impairment and metabolic problems, new research at Oregon State University shows.

The role of dosage in assessing risk of hormone therapy for menopause

July 27, 2017
When it comes to assessing the risk of estrogen therapy for menopause, how the therapy is delivered—taking a pill versus wearing a patch on one's skin—doesn't affect risk or benefit, researchers at UCLA and elsewhere ...

Blowing smoke? E-cigarettes might help smokers quit

July 26, 2017
People who used e-cigarettes were more likely to kick the habit than those who didn't, a new study found.

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.