Non-alcoholic red wine may help reduce high blood pressure

September 6, 2012

Men with high risk for heart disease had lower blood pressure after drinking non-alcoholic red wine every day for four weeks, according to a new study in the American Heart Association journal Circulation Research.

Non-alcoholic red wine increased participants' levels of nitric oxide, which helped decrease both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, researchers said. Nitric oxide is a molecule in the body that helps blood vessels relax and allows more blood to reach your heart and organs.

Researchers studied 67 men with diabetes or three or more who ate a common diet plus one of the following drinks: about 10 ounces of red wine, non-alcoholic red wine or about 3 ounces of gin. All of the men tried each diet/beverage combination for 4 weeks.

The red wine and nonalcoholic wine contained equal amounts of polyphenols, an antioxidant that decreases blood pressure.

During the red wine phase, the men had very little reduction in blood pressure and there was no change while drinking gin. However, after drinking non-alcoholic red wine, blood pressure decreased by about 6mmHg in systolic and 2mmHg in diastolic blood pressure—possibly reducing the risk of heart disease by 14 percent and stroke by as much as 20 percent.

Researchers concluded that the alcohol in red wine weakens its ability to . But polyphenols—still present after alcohol is removed from wine—are likely the beneficial element in wine.

Explore further: Comparison of effects of red wine versus white wine on hormones related to breast cancer risk

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semperfe
not rated yet Sep 07, 2012
This confirms that I am doing the right thing by having taken for the past 10 years a dietary supplement from Spain which is made entirely of the Spanish blue grape's pulp, seeds, skin and stems. It's called res-juventa and every capsule is basically Spanish red wine without the alcohol. I am 51 now but feel like 35 and get a crisp clean bill of health in every check-up from my dr. If you open a capsule and put it in (even as much as a gallon) of water, it "converts it" visibly into red wine (but no alcohol!) I am thrilled about this report!

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