Poll: Most see health law being implemented

September 26, 2012 by Jennifer Agiesta

(AP)—Americans may not be all that crazy about President Barack Obama's health care law, but a new poll shows they don't see it going away.

The Associated Press-GfK poll finds that about 7 in 10 Americans think the overhaul law will go into effect fully, with some changes, ranging from minor to major alterations.

Just 12 percent say they expect the Act—dismissed as "Obamacare" by its opponents—to be completely repealed.

Forty-one percent say they expect the law to be implemented with minor changes, while 31 percent say they expect to see it take effect with major changes. Only 11 percent say they think it will be implemented as passed.

The law's big coverage expansion for the uninsured doesn't come until 2014.

Explore further: Poll: Health overhaul unpopular, but not as feared

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