Are restrictions to scientific research costing lives?

September 5, 2012

In 'Censors on Campus', Index on Censorship asks whether lives might be saved by making vital research freely available. As malaria expert Bart Knols argues, in some parts of Asia and Africa the fight against malaria is severely hampered because doctors and researchers are denied full access to the 3,000 articles published on the disease each year. At the same time, scientists living and working in developing countries are prevented from becoming global players in the public health arena.

In this special issue looking at academic freedom around the world, Thomas Doherty argues that are endangering the pursuit of knowledge in UK universities and Heather L Weaver looks at new tactics to bring creationism into the classroom. Plus exclusive reports about protest on campus in Israel, Turkey and Thailand.

Also in this issue: As the Leveson Inquiry prepares to report on the culture and ethics of the press in the UK, Alan Rusbridger, Guido Fawkes, Trevor Kavanagh, Mark Lewis and Martin Moore outline their hopes, fears and expectations.

Explore further: Malaria prevention saves children's lives

More information: 'Censors on Campus' edited by Jo Glanville published September 2012 in Index on Censorship. The article will be free to access for a limited time here: ioc.sagepub.com/

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