Routine screening for ovarian cancer a failure: study

September 11, 2012

Routine screening for ovarian cancer is ineffective and at times can do more harm than good, a panel of cancer specialists has concluded.

"There is no existing method of screening for ovarian cancer that is effective in reducing deaths," said US Preventive Services Task Force member and chair Dr Virginia Moyer.

"In fact, a high percentage of women who undergo screening experience false-positive test results and consequently may be subjected to unnecessary harms, such as major surgery," added Moyer in a statement on the group's website and in the .

The tests include ovarian scans and blood tests that look at a marker that can be linked to the disease.

The group said they are not recommended routinely for women who do not show signs of the disease, or who have (BRCA1 and BRCA2) that put them at a greater risk of developing it.

Other medical groups already have made similar recommendations including the "" and "American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists."

is fairly rare with 22,200 new cases a year in the United States and 15,500 deaths.

Explore further: U.S. panel rejects ovarian cancer screens for low-risk women

Related Stories

U.S. panel rejects ovarian cancer screens for low-risk women

September 10, 2012
(HealthDay)—A leading U.S. government panel has recommended against ovarian cancer screening for women who are not at high risk for the disease.

U.S. panel rejects ovarian cancer screening

April 10, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A leading U.S. government panel has renewed its 2004 recommendation that women at average risk for ovarian cancer not get screened for the disease.

Mismatch between cancer genetics counseling and testing guidelines and physician practices

July 25, 2011
A new analysis has found that many doctors report that they do not appropriately offer breast and ovarian cancer counseling and testing services to their female patients. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed ...

Recommended for you

Researchers identify gene variants linked to a high-risk children's cancer

September 25, 2017
Pediatric researchers investigating the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have identified common gene variants that raise the risk of an aggressive form of that disease. The discovery may assist doctors in better diagnosing ...

Prostaglandin E1 inhibits leukemia stem cells

September 25, 2017
Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to results from a University of Iowa study in mice.

Cancer vaccines need to target T cells that can persist in the long fight against cancer

September 25, 2017
Cancer vaccines may need to better target T cells that can hold up to the long fight against cancer, scientists report.

Lung cancer treatment could be having negative health effect on hearts

September 25, 2017
Radiotherapy treatment for lung cancer could have a negative effect on the health of your heart new research has found.

MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer

September 25, 2017
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between aggressive and slow-growing ...

Alternative splicing, an important mechanism for cancer

September 22, 2017
Cancer, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, arises from the disruption of essential mechanisms of the normal cell life cycle, such as replication control, DNA repair and cell death. Thanks to the advances ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.