Guideline implementation may impact VTE quality of care

October 22, 2012

The quality of care of patients hospitalized with venous thromboembolism (VTE) significantly improved between 2005 and 2009, and researchers suggest these improvements may be due to the implementation of VTE treatment guidelines.

Using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, researchers from Inova Fairfax Hospital and Betty and Guy Beatty Center for Integrated Research, Falls Church, Virginia, reviewed measures in 800,000 VTE discharges that took place from 2005 to 2009.

Results showed that in-hospital mortality and length of stay decreased during this time, while total cost per case remained stable.

Results also indicated that VTE diagnosis increased, as did severity of illness.

Researchers speculate that VTE care improvements may be tied to the implementation of VTE treatment guidelines and more aggressive care.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the , held October 20 – 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.

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