Swimming pools don't help Indigenous children's hearing, contradiction of previous study

October 15, 2012
Swimming pools don’t help Indigenous children’s hearing
Swimming carnival day at Mimili Community Pool.

(Medical Xpress)—Swimming pools are not the answer to solving the horrific prevalence of middle ear disease afflicting Indigenous children in remote communities, a ground-breaking report from Flinders University reveals.

The Federally-funded study, conducted in South Australia's Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands and Yalata from 2009-2011, found chlorinated saltwater pools have no direct benefit on the ear health and hearing of school-aged Indigenous children.

The findings contradict an influential and widely-publicised 2003 Australian study which showed swimming pools in two in remote Western Australia significantly reduced some ear disease in children.

Flinders University Associate Professor in Linnett Sanchez, the study's chief investigator, said while swimming pools were "an incredibly important social and recreational asset", they had no effect in reducing  disease – a serious, long-term condition that affects alarmingly high numbers of remote Indigenous children.

"Otitis media (middle ear disease) is a disease of poverty in Indigenous children," Associate Professor Sanchez said.

"It's a serious and complex problem that in remote Indigenous children typically persists throughout childhood and is very difficult to treat so it's not surprising that a single intervention such as a swimming pool wouldn't make a difference," she said.

The Flinders study assessed the ear health of 813 different children aged between 5 and 17 years, with a total of 2100 audiological and medical assessments conducted across 11 remote Indigenous communities, both with and without pools, twice a year during the three-year research.

The "whole of population" study included every child who was at school on the day the researchers visited, and was undertaken both at the end of the swimming season and at the end of winter to gauge any .

The study did not measure other indices of health, such as skin infections, that might be improved by access to swimming pools.

"We found ear health was actually worse at the end of summer – there's no straightforward explanation for that but it has nothing to do with pools," Associate Professor Sanchez said.

"So when they conducted the WA study and saw an improvement after winter, the change was attributed to a swimming pool effect."

Aside from ascertaining any effects on ear health and hearing, Associate Professor Sanchez said the Flinders study was able to determine the influence of on school attendance.

"The communities initiated a 'no school, no pool' policy when the pools were first put in but we found no difference in school attendance rates in pool and non-pool communities, which average 74 per cent.

"School attendance issues, just like ear health, have many contributing social, cultural and health factors so again there's no single solution."

Associate Professor Sanchez said Indigenous ear health required urgent action on many fronts in Anangu communities, and more generally in remote Australia.

"Among five-year old Anangu children starting school with English as a second language, 13 per cent have hearing levels in both ears which meet standard audiological criteria for a hearing aid fitting, while 36 per cent of all school age children have a perforation in one or both eardrums.

"The awful persistence of eardrum perforations is seen right through the oldest  secondary students which means many adolescents are trying to find jobs as young adults with the significant social and health effects of hearing loss, as well as generally reduced educational attainment, contributed to by years of poor hearing."

Explore further: Drowning is leading cause of kids' accidental death: CDC

Related Stories

Drowning is leading cause of kids' accidental death: CDC

May 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Drowning kills more American children 1 to 4 years old than any cause except birth defects, according to a new federal report.

Recommended for you

Expert: Be concerned about how apps collect, share health data

October 20, 2017
As of 2016 there were more than 165,000 health and wellness apps available though the Apple App Store alone. According to Rice University medical media expert Kirsten Ostherr, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates ...

More teens than ever aren't getting enough sleep

October 19, 2017
If you're a young person who can't seem to get enough sleep, you're not alone: A new study led by San Diego State University Professor of Psychology Jean Twenge finds that adolescents today are sleeping fewer hours per night ...

Across Asia, liver cancer is linked to herbal remedies: study

October 18, 2017
Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday.

Eating better throughout adult years improves physical fitness in old age, suggests study

October 18, 2017
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia

October 18, 2017
Daily calcium intake among adults appears to vary quite widely around the world in distinct regional patterns, according to a new systematic review of research data ahead of World Osteoporosis Day on Friday, Oct. 20.

New study: Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

October 17, 2017
Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). And in recent years, the percentage of care delivered ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.