Potential new colorectal cancer treatment target identified

October 7, 2012
Potential new colorectal cancer treatment target identified
The cell surface marker carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 is a novel marker for colorectal cancer stem cell isolation, which halts tumor growth when silenced, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Cancer.

(HealthDay)—The cell surface marker carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CD66c) is a novel marker for colorectal cancer stem cell isolation, which halts tumor growth when silenced, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Cancer.

Marica Gemei, Ph.D., of CEINGE-Advanced Biotechnology in Naples, Italy, and colleagues characterized CD66c expression in colorectal cancer stem cells by and immunohistochemistry in colon cancer samples and normal tissue. They evaluated its expression in colon cancer stem cells and in stem cell-enriched colon spheres and examined the role of RNA-mediated CD66c silencing on the in vitro and in vivo growth of Caco2 .

Compared with normal colon tissues, the researchers found that CD66c expression was significantly higher in colorectal cancer samples, with expression correlating with cancer stage. Its expression was absent in Prominin 1 (CD133)-positive cells from normal colon but was brightest (CD66cbright) in CD133-positive colon cancer samples. In vitro experiments in stem cell-enriched colon spheres exhibited cells expressing CD66cbright, similar to that observed in fresh . In Caco2 cells, CD66c silencing hampered in vitro proliferation and clonogenic potential, and in vivo xenograft experimentation attenuated the tumorigenic potential of Caco2 cells.

"CD66cbright expression was associated with colon cancer stem cells and CD66c silencing blocked tumor growth, thereby opening the way to a potential new treatment for colon cancer," the authors write.

Explore further: Whole grape - seed and skin - may be perfect colon cancer fighting food

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Whole grape - seed and skin - may be perfect colon cancer fighting food

June 2, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Colorado State University researchers may have unlocked the secret to why drinking wine and eating grapes can fight colon cancer. The study looks at how two grape compounds work in conjunction to kill ...

UH researchers explore treatments for breast and colon cancers

August 22, 2011
University of Houston (UH) researchers have their sights set on developing possible treatments for breast and colon cancer.

Recommended for you

Outdoor light at night linked with increased breast cancer risk in women

August 17, 2017
Women who live in areas with higher levels of outdoor light at night may be at higher risk for breast cancer than those living in areas with lower levels, according to a large long-term study from Harvard T.H. Chan School ...

Scientists develop novel immunotherapy technology for prostate cancer

August 17, 2017
A study led by scientists at The Wistar Institute describes a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer based on the use of synthetic DNA to directly encode protective antibodies against a cancer specific ...

Scientists develop blood test that spots tumor-derived DNA in people with early-stage cancers

August 16, 2017
In a bid to detect cancers early and in a noninvasive way, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have developed a test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA in blood and have used it to ...

Toxic formaldehyde is produced inside our own cells, scientists discover

August 16, 2017
New research has revealed that some of the toxin formaldehyde in our bodies does not come from our environment - it is a by-product of an essential reaction inside our own cells. This could provide new targets for developing ...

Cell cycle-blocking drugs can shrink tumors by enlisting immune system in attack on cancer

August 16, 2017
In the brief time that drugs known as CDK4/6 inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, doctors have made a startling observation: in certain patients, the drugs—designed to halt cancer ...

Researchers find 'switch' that turns on immune cells' tumor-killing ability

August 16, 2017
Molecular biologists led by Leonid Pobezinsky and his wife and research collaborator Elena Pobezinskaya at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have published results that for the first time show how a microRNA molecule ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.