Pulmonary hypertension deaths and hospitalizations on the rise

October 22, 2012

New research indicates an increase in the number of US deaths and hospitalizations related to pulmonary hypertension. A research team from Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC, examined multiple cause of death mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System and hospital discharge data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey for 1999-2009.

Results showed that since 1999, the number of deaths and hospitalizations, as well as death rates and , have increased for pulmonary hypertension, particularly among women and older adults.

During 1999, death rates were higher for men than women; however, by 2002, no difference in rate was observed because of increasing death rates among women and declining death rates among men; after 2003, higher death rates were observed for women.

Death rates throughout the reporting period 1990-2008 have been higher for blacks than for whites. In addition, a higher rate of hospitalization was observed in the Northeast than in other regions of the United States.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the , held October 20 – 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.

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