Severe anemia linked to poorer heart surgery outcomes

October 3, 2012
Severe anemia linked to poorer heart surgery outcomes
Adults undergoing cardiac surgery who have moderate-to-severe preoperative anemia have significantly increased morbidity and mortality compared with non-severely anemic patients, according to research published in the October issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

(HealthDay)—Adults undergoing cardiac surgery who have moderate-to-severe preoperative anemia have significantly increased morbidity and mortality compared with non-severely anemic patients, according to research published in the October issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Marco Ranucci, M.D., of the Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Policlinico San Donato in Milan, and colleagues conducted a to examine postoperative outcomes for 401 adult patients with severe preoperative anemia (hematocrit <30 percent) who underwent . Postoperative morbidity and mortality were compared with those of a control group of 401 propensity matched non-severely anemic patients.

The researchers found that preoperative comorbidities and operative details were comparable between the groups. For patients with severe preoperative anemia, there was a significantly higher rate of stroke (1 versus 0 percent; P = 0.045), major morbidity (27.4 versus 17.5 percent; P = 0.001), and (12.7 versus 7.5 percent; P = 0.014). These results were confirmed on additional analysis which included patients with moderate preoperative anemia.

"Moderate-to-severe preoperative anemia is a risk factor for major morbidity and operative mortality in adult cardiac operations," the authors write. "This finding is confirmative of the role of preoperative anemia in determining adverse events in major non-cardiac operations."

Explore further: Preoperative aspirin therapy can benefit cardiac surgery patients

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Preoperative aspirin therapy can benefit cardiac surgery patients

December 5, 2011
Aspirin taken within five days of cardiac surgery is associated with a significant decrease in the risk of major postoperative complications, including renal failure, a lengthy intensive care unit stay and even early death ...

Predictors of length of hospital stay after spine surgery ID'd

May 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A variety of pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors contribute to increased length of stay (LOS) for patients who undergo level 1 minimally invasive (MIS) transforaminal interbody fusions (TLIF) spine surgery, ...

GI cancer resection OK with mild cirrhotic liver dysfunction

July 10, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with cirrhosis, resection of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies correlates with poor early postoperative outcomes, with severity of liver disease being the primary determinant of postoperative ...

Anemia may more than triple your risk of dying after a stroke

February 2, 2012
Being anemic could more than triple your risk of dying within a year after having a stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2012.

Recommended for you

Smoking raises risk of aneurysm recurrence after endovascular treatment

August 17, 2017
In a new study, researchers report people who have experienced an aneurysm have another reason to quit smoking.

Study adds to evidence that most prescribed opioid pills go unused

August 2, 2017
In a review of half a dozen published studies in which patients self-reported use of opioids prescribed to them after surgery, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a substantial majority of patients used only some or ...

Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery times

August 2, 2017
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed ...

World's first child hand transplant a 'success'

July 19, 2017
The first child in the world to undergo a double hand transplant is now able to write, feed and dress himself, doctors said Tuesday, declaring the ground-breaking operation a success after 18 months.

Knee surgery—have we been doing it wrong?

July 18, 2017
A team of University at Buffalo medical doctors have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery.

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vessels

July 17, 2017
The liver is a particularly squishy, slippery organ, prone to shifting both deadly tumors and life-preserving blood vessels by inches between the time they're discovered on a CT scan and when the patient is lying on an operating ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.