Steroid-related meningitis cases rise to 105

October 8, 2012 by Mike Stobbe

(AP)—Health officials say the number of people sickened by a deadly meningitis outbreak has now reached 105 cases.

The number of deaths rose by one to eight, with another in the U.S. state of Tennessee.

The updated the count on Monday. The list of nine states with reported cases stayed the same. Tennessee, Michigan, Virginia, Indiana, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota, North Carolina and Ohio previously reported cases.

Officials have tied the fungal meningitis outbreak to steroid shots for back pain. The steroid was made by a specialty pharmacy in Massachusetts.

The company has recalled the steroid which was sent to clinics in 23 states. The government last week urged doctors not to use any of the company's products.

Explore further: CDC: More than 90 people ill with meningitis

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