Taiwan may not sustain popular health insurance

October 4, 2012

(AP)—A government official says Taiwan might be unable to support its highly-praised health insurance program because of a growing elderly population.

Cabinet Minister Hsueh Cherng-tay said late Wednesday the program's projected shortfall might be too much for the government to bear by 2025.

Taiwan's 23 million people pay minimal monthly premiums and receive largely free medical care for ailments ranging from the to complex diseases. The government has subsidized shortfalls so far.

Hsueh says cutting-edge medical treatments have worsened the shortfalls and said Taiwan's grew 30 percent in the past decade and their health outlays shot up 90 percent.

Those 65 and older accounted for 11 percent of Taiwan's population in 2010. That's expected to grow to 20 percent in 2025.

Explore further: Taiwan to curb 'big-stomach' eating contests

shares

Related Stories

Taiwan to curb 'big-stomach' eating contests

November 3, 2011
Taiwan moved Thursday to curb eating contests, a fad that has caused at least one death, and suggested the national health insurance stop paying for participants seeking medical treatment afterwards.

Recommended for you

Group suggests pushing age of adolescence to 24

January 22, 2018
A small group of researchers with the Royal Children's Hospital in Australia is suggesting that it might be time to change the span of years that define adolescence—from the current 10 to 19 to a proposed 10 to 24 years ...

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.