Bristol-Pfizer anticlot drug gets key EU approval

November 20, 2012 by The Associated Press

European regulators have approved a crucial new anticlotting drug, Eliquis, for preventing strokes and dangerous clots in the circulatory system.

Eliquis was approved for use in the 27 European Union countries in patients at risk for such clots, called systemic embolisms, or for strokes who have an called atrial fibrillation.

It's the second EU approval for Eliquis, developed by partners Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and .

Eliquis was approved in the EU in May 2011 for preventing dangerous clots from forming in deep veins after hip or .

The new approval clears the drug for use in far more patients. In Europe alone, about 6 million people have atrial fibrillation. Eliquis is part of a new generation of clot-preventing drugs, but isn't approved in the U.S.

Explore further: Anti-clot drug recommended for new approval in EU

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