HTN risk up for african-american live kidney donors

November 6, 2012
HTN risk up for african-american live kidney donors
African-American live kidney donors have a significantly increased risk of hypertension compared with non-donors, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

(HealthDay)—African-American live kidney donors have a significantly increased risk of hypertension compared with non-donors, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

To examine the risk of hypertension and kidney disease in donors, Mona D. Doshi, M.D., of Wayne State University in Detroit, and associates evaluated 103 African-American live kidney donors, who donated between 1993 and 2006 at two transplant centers, and 235 matched non-donors from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults prospective cohort study. Donors and non-donors were followed for a mean of 6.8 or 6.4 years, respectively.

The researchers found that donors had a significantly increased hypertension risk compared with non-donors (40.8 versus 17.9 percent; relative risk, 2.4). Just over half (52.4 percent) of the donors with hypertension were untreated. Of the donors, 15.5 percent had an estimated <60 mL/min/1.73 m², 5.8 percent had microalbuminuria, and none of them were on dialysis.

"The data from our retrospective study demonstrates that live is associated with increased risk of hypertension in African-Americans," the authors write. "At this time, results of the current study should not dissuade African-Americans from being a live , but does raise awareness about the importance of donor follow-up."

One of the authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Transplantation issues: Kidney donors and children in need of transplants

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