Miscarriages tied to elevated risk for heart conditions

November 7, 2012
Miscarriages tied to elevated risk for heart conditions
Study found hardening of the arteries more common in women with more miscarriages.

(HealthDay)—A new study finds that women who have had one or more miscarriages are at increased risk for hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), which can lead to problems such as heart attack and stroke.

The study was scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the annual meeting in Los Angeles.

Researchers looked at from more than 1 million Danish women to examine the association between miscarriage and heart attack, stroke or renovascular hypertension, which is caused by narrowing of the arteries that carry blood to the kidneys.

Compared to women who had no miscarriages, women who had one miscarriage were 11 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack. The risk more than doubled in women who had four or more miscarriages, according to a heart association news release.

Women who had one miscarriage had a 13 percent increased risk of stroke, and those who had four or more miscarriages had an 89 percent increased risk.

Women who had one miscarriage had a 15 percent increased risk of renovascular hypertension, and those who had four or more miscarriages had nearly quadruple the risk.

Each additional miscarriage a women had led to a 9 percent increased , a 13 percent increased risk of stroke and a 19 percent increased risk of renovascular hypertension.

Although the study found an association between number of and certain heart risks, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Explore further: Women, young adults misinterpret chest pain, study finds

More information: The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about atherosclerosis.

Related Stories

Women, young adults misinterpret chest pain, study finds

November 6, 2012
(HealthDay)—Women with chest pain are more likely than men to wait more than a day to seek care, a new study finds.

New class of platelet blockers proves effective in phase III trial

March 26, 2012
Adding vorapaxar, an investigational platelet blocker, to standard antiplatelet therapy significantly reduces the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with known atherosclerosis, a hardening and narrowing of ...

Recommended for you

New discovery could reverse tissue damage caused by heart attacks

July 25, 2017
A new discovery by University of Bristol scientists helps to explain how cells which surround blood vessels, called pericytes, stimulate new blood vessels to grow with the hormone 'leptin' playing a key role. Leptin is produced ...

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.