Alcohol causes a quarter of Europe road deaths

December 15, 2012

Alcohol abuse is responsible for around a quarter of the 30,000 people who die in road accidents across the European Union every year, the bloc's drugs agency said in a report published on Friday.

"Around 30,000 people die in in the EU every year, with alcohol still the number one substance endangering lives on Europes roads," the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction said.

It said alcohol accounted for around a quarter of road deaths.

The Lisbon-based agency was presenting the results of its Driving under the influence of drugs, alcohol and medicines (DRUID project), which ran between 2006 and 2011.

The survey randomly tested drivers across 13 member EU countries. "Alcohol was detected in 3.5 percent of drivers, in 1.9 percent and medicines in 1.4 percent." EMCDDA said.

"The DRUID project has given policymakers the best available scientific evidence on levels of drug and alcohol use in drivers and the responses available today to improve road safety in Europe," EMCDDA director Wolfgang Goetz said.

Explore further: Drug use tied to fatal car crashes

Related Stories

Drug use tied to fatal car crashes

June 23, 2011
It's well known that drunk driving can have fatal consequences, but a new study suggests that alcohol is not the only drug that’s a danger on the road.

Safety issue revealed as 1 in 20 Australian workers admits to drinking at work

June 28, 2011
A national survey has found that more than one in twenty Australian workers report using alcohol while at work or just before work, and more than one in fifty report taking drugs during or just before work. These findings, ...

Marijuana use may double the risk of accidents for drivers

October 6, 2011
Over 10 million people age 12 or older are estimated to have driven under the influence of illicit drugs in the prior year, according to a 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. While marijuana is the most commonly ...

Stoned drivers: UVIC part of study on marijuana impairment

July 29, 2011
A University of Victoria researcher is a co-investigator for a study on whether drivers who are high on marijuana cause more crashes than sober drivers.

Recommended for you

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

App lets patients work alone or with others to prevent, monitor, and reverse chronic disease

July 24, 2017
Lack of patient adherence to treatment plans is a lingering, costly problem in the United States. But MIT Media Lab spinout Twine Health is proving that regular interventions from a patient's community of supporters can greatly ...

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.