FDA pledges support for med tech initiative

December 3, 2012

(AP)—The Food and Drug Administration says it will collaborate with medical device manufacturers on a public-private partnership designed to speed up the development of new medical technology.

The agency says it hopes to offer guidance to the Medical Device Innovation Consortium, a new industry-backed group that aims to simplify the design and testing of medical devices.

Medical device makers have criticized the FDA for an overly burdensome review process, which they claim slows down development of important new therapies. Congressional Republicans have held several hearings to scrutinize the agency's system.

Faced with criticism from industry and Capitol Hill, the FDA has been highlighting efforts to slash red tape and accelerate review times.

The new consortium was created by LifeScience Alley, a Minnesota-based industry group that includes leading manufacturer Inc.

Explore further: FDA orders safety studies of women's surgical mesh

shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers identify source of opioids' side effects

January 17, 2017

A commercially available drug may help drastically reduce two side effects of opioid painkillers—a growing tolerance and a paradoxical increased sensitivity to pain—without affecting the drugs' ability to reduce pain, ...

CVS generic competitor to EpiPen, sold at a 6th the price

January 12, 2017

CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan's EpiPen at about a sixth of its price, just months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to ...

Many misuse OTC sleep aids: survey

December 29, 2016

(HealthDay)—People struggling with insomnia often turn to non-prescription sleep remedies that may be habit-forming and are only intended for short-term use, according to a new Consumer Reports survey.

The pill won't kill your sexual desire, researchers say

December 15, 2016

Taking the pill doesn't lower your sexual desire, contrary to popular belief, according to research published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. The authors of the research, from the University of Kentucky and Indiana University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.