Model can ID patients at risk for serious safety events

December 12, 2012
Model can ID patients at risk for serious safety events
Implementation of a system to identify and mitigate patient risk can reduce serious safety events among inpatients, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Implementation of a system to identify and mitigate patient risk can reduce serious safety events (SSEs) among inpatients, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Pediatrics.

Patrick W. Brady, M.D., from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and colleagues reviewed recent SSEs and floor-to- (ICU) transfers. In an effort to decrease transfers determined to be unrecognized situation awareness failures events (UNSAFEs), an intervention was developed and tested to reliably and proactively identify patient risk and mitigate that risk through unit-based three-times daily inpatient huddles.

The researchers identified five that correlated with each event: family concerns, high-risk treatments, presence of an elevated early warning score, of a watcher/clinician, and communication concerns. When using the model for improvement there was a significant reduction in the rate of UNSAFE transfers, from 4.4 to 2.4 per 10,000 non-ICU inpatient days over the study period. There was also a significant increase in the days between inpatient SSEs.

"A reliable system to identify, mitigate, and escalate risk can be implemented in a children's hospital and is associated with a reduction in safety events in a context where these events were already uncommon," the authors write. "Models to identify risk early and reliably intervene are likely generalizable both to different clinical systems and to modify different outcomes such as the patient/family experience and patient flow."

Explore further: Families report adverse events in hospitalized children not tracked by health-care providers

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Families report adverse events in hospitalized children not tracked by health-care providers

November 21, 2011
Families of hospitalized children can provide valuable information about adverse events relating to their children's care that complements information documented by health care professionals, states a study published in CMAJ ...

Medical complications in hospitalized children: The Canadian Paediatric Adverse Events Study

August 1, 2012
More children experience complications or unintended injuries, especially related to surgery, in academic hospitals compared with community hospitals, but adverse events in the former are less likely to be preventable, according ...

Simple, inexpensive risk score can shorten length of stay for patients

October 23, 2012
A simple-to-use risk score can identify low-risk patients following a severe heart attack (STEMI) and may provide an opportunity to employ early discharge strategies to reduce length of hospital stay and save hospital costs ...

Recommended for you

At the cellular level, a child's loss of a father is associated with increased stress

July 18, 2017
The absence of a father—due to incarceration, death, separation or divorce—has adverse physical and behavioral consequences for a growing child. But little is known about the biological processes that underlie this link ...

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk

June 22, 2017
New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.