Number of independent physicians continues to decline

December 11, 2012
Number of independent physicians continues to decline
Physician business models are transforming, with a sustained shift away from independent practice, according to report released by the consulting firm Accenture.

(HealthDay)—Physician business models are transforming, with a sustained shift away from independent practice, according to report released by the consulting firm Accenture.

Kristin Ficery, from Health Strategy in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a survey of 204 physicians equally split between primary care and specialty practices. Physicians were geographically distributed across the United States.

According to the report, private practice doctors have increasingly sought employment, leaving independent practice. The number of independent physicians has dropped from 57 percent in 2000 to 39 percent in 2012. It is estimated that by the end of 2013 the market of independent physicians will decline further to 36 percent. One of the main reasons for physicians seeking employment is the cost and expense of running a business, cited by 87 percent of independent physicians surveyed. Other concerns causing physicians to seek employment include the prevalence of managed care (61 percent), requirements (53 percent), and maintaining/managing staff (53 percent). For doctors who wish to remain independent, an estimated one in three will adopt subscription-based care models, and this trend is likely to increase 100 percent per year for three years.

"Accenture research shows that independent physicians continue to dwindle and that those remaining will turn to subscription-based models to sustain profits and improve care," the authors write.

Explore further: U.S. doctors embracing electronic health records: survey

More information: More Information

Related Stories

U.S. doctors embracing electronic health records: survey

July 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A majority of U.S. physicians have now adopted an electronic health record system as part of their routine practice, a new national survey reveals.

One in four physicians uses social media daily

December 10, 2012
A new survey shows that about one in four physicians uses social media daily or multiple times a day to scan or explore medical information, and 14 percent use social media each day to contribute new information, according ...

Doctors' pay increases lag other health professionals

November 27, 2012
(HealthDay)—The incomes of U.S. doctors have grown less than the incomes of other health professionals over the past few decades, a new study indicates.

Recommended for you

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring

July 21, 2017
A high-fat diet not only creates health problems for expectant mothers, but new research in an animal model suggests it alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of their offspring and has a long-term impact ...

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.