Medical examiner seeks genetic clues to shooter

December 19, 2012
This undated photo shows Adam Lanza posing for a group photo of the technology club which appeared in the Newtown High School yearbook. Authorities have identified Lanza as the gunman who killed his mother at their home and then opened fire Friday, Dec. 14, 2012, inside an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., killing 26 people, including 20 children, before killing himself. Richard Novia, a one-time adviser to the technology club, verified that the photo shows Lanza. (AP Photo)

(AP)—Connecticut's chief medical examiner says he's seeking genetic clues to help explain why a shooter killed 20 children and six adults in a Newtown elementary school.

Dr. H. Wayne Carver tells The Hartford Courant that he wants to know if there is any identifiable disease associated with the behavior of the shooter, Adam Lanza. He is working with the University of Connecticut department of genetics.

Paula Levy, a mediator who worked with Lanza's parents during their divorce, has said Lanza was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, an autism-like disorder.

Carver says Asperger's is not associated with violent behavior. He says he's not considering it as a reason for Lanza's rampage on Friday.

Carver is awaiting toxicology testing results for Lanza and other information.

Lanza fatally shot himself as first responders approached the school Friday morning.

Explore further: Experts: No link between Asperger's, violence

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BSD
not rated yet Dec 26, 2012
Here's a genetic disorder, it's known under different names:

Libertarianitis, Republican Pox, Wingnutosis, Conservativosis and Righwing Pox. There is one more disease only known by it's initials NRA.

Gene therapy should be able to cure some of those, the others may have to be eradicated by an America wide drug programme. Eventually those diseases will be kept in a test tube in a secure location. Similar to smallpox. Unlike smallpox, I cannot see any use for them, not even as a biological curiosity so I would destroy the last surviving samples.
BSD
not rated yet Dec 26, 2012
It is important to note, Libertarianitis, Republican Pox, Wingnutosis, Conservativosis and Rightwing Pox are especially deadly when combined with the disease NRA. When these diseases combine, sufferers fire off deadly spores of lead tipped shot called bullets. These spores hit non-sufferers of the above diseases either killing them or badly maiming them, they remain defenceless against the sufferers. The other danger is many non-sufferers can die at the hands of a sufferer whom eventually seems to die from self inflicted spores. The diseases have no respect for the young, the innocent or the old.

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