Survey shows breakthrough medical research relies heavily on NIH funding

December 10, 2012

A survey highlighting the correlation between today's cutting edge medical research and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding was released today at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the preeminent medical meeting for physicians and scientists in hematology that draws more than 20,000 attendees from around the world. The survey, representing responses from 1,040 abstract presenters from the U.S. and abroad, demonstrates how critical NIH funding has been to the success of science and medicine.

"Every year researchers and doctors across the globe look to the ASH annual meeting for breakthrough science," said ASH President-Elect Janis Abkowitz, MD of the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. "With nearly two-thirds of the U.S. presenters at this year's annual meeting reporting that they rely on NIH funding, this survey shows unequivocally that those breakthroughs depend on NIH investment."

also show that in addition to funding current research, a greater number – 86 percent of American abstract presenters – report that they had referenced an NIH-funded study for their own research over the course of their careers. In addition, the survey reveals a high level of concern among scientists and physicians about the impact of reduced NIH funding. Of the U.S. respondents, 75 percent said that when it comes to and development, they are "extremely concerned" (responses on a scale from 1 = not concerned to 5 = extremely concerned) about the threat of NIH and the impact on their future careers.

"As a young investigator, I am dependent on the NIH to help fund my research," said ASH member Manali Patel, MD, MPH, a Postdoctoral /Oncology Medical Fellow at Stanford University who focuses on cancer quality and research. "I love my research and would love to continue it, but am unsure where the direction of research funding is heading and very wary of the impact of NIH funding on my future career."

The survey also shows that the impact of NIH goes well beyond U.S. borders. In fact, 52 percent of international presenters said that they have referenced an NIH-funded study for their own research and 22 percent report being "extremely concerned" about the threat of NIH budget cuts.

Explore further: New study identifies gaps in NIH funding success rates for black researchers

Related Stories

New study identifies gaps in NIH funding success rates for black researchers

August 18, 2011
Black scientists were significantly less likely than their white counterparts to receive research funding from the National Institutes of Health, according to an analysis of data from 2000 to 2006.

Research funding slump alarms head of US cancer institutes

September 25, 2012
The head of the US National Cancer Institute warned Tuesday that the United States could lose its global leadership in research into the disease because of lower spending.

Can disclosure hurt the translation of research?

September 19, 2012
All major clinical trials now include disclosures detailing who funded the study to ensure transparency. However, is it possible that this transparency is actually hurting research? One might assume that the methodological ...

Recommended for you

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

'bench to bedside to bench': Scientists call for closer basic-clinical collaborations

March 24, 2017
In the era of genome sequencing, it's time to update the old "bench-to-bedside" shorthand for how basic research discoveries inform clinical practice, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), National Human Genome Research ...

The ethics of tracking athletes' biometric data

January 18, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—Whether it is a FitBit or a heart rate monitor, biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to ...

Financial ties between researchers and drug industry linked to positive trial results

January 18, 2017
Financial ties between researchers and companies that make the drugs they are studying are independently associated with positive trial results, suggesting bias in the evidence base, concludes a study published by The BMJ ...

Best of Last Year – The top Medical Xpress articles of 2016

December 23, 2016
(Medical Xpress)—It was a big year for research involving overall health issues, starting with a team led by researchers at the UNC School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health who unearthed more evidence that ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.