Modified DASH intervention feasible for African-Americans

January 28, 2013
Modified DASH intervention feasible for african-americans
For African-Americans in an under-resourced community, use of a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-intervention is feasible, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

(HealthDay)—For African-Americans in an under-resourced community, use of a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-intervention is feasible, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

Melicia C. Whitt-Glover, Ph.D., from the Gramercy Research Group in Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues examined the feasibility of using a culturally modified version of DASH among African-Americans in two North Carolina communities. Participants with high blood pressure who used fewer than three antihypertensive medications were recruited, and of 152 potential participants, 14 were randomized to the intervention (two individual and nine group DASH sessions) and 11 to the (one individual session and printed DASH educational materials). Data were collected at baseline and at 12 weeks.

The researchers found that, at baseline, mean blood pressure was 130/78 mm Hg and 19 participants used antihypertensive medications. On average, intervention participants attended seven of nine group sessions. Compared with , for intervention participants, there were significant increases in fruit and vegetables consumption after 12 weeks, and increases in the participants' confidence in being able to eat healthier snacks and to reduce salt and fat consumption. Blood pressure did not decrease significantly.

"Implementation of a culturally modified, community-based DASH intervention was feasible in our small sample of African-Americans, which included people being treated for ," the authors write. "Future studies should evaluate the long-term effect of this program in a larger sample."

Explore further: African Americans less likely to adhere to DASH diet for lowering blood pressure

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

African Americans less likely to adhere to DASH diet for lowering blood pressure

September 19, 2012
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which promotes consumption of more fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, and whole grain, and less meats and sweets, is a proven effective treatment for hypertension. ...

Home telemonitoring by pharmacists helps control patients' blood pressure

May 10, 2012
Patients receiving telemonitoring along with high blood pressure management support from a pharmacist were more likely to lower their blood pressure than those not receiving extra support, according to research presented ...

Home blood pressure monitoring may not benefit patients with stroke and hypertension

November 5, 2012
Home blood pressure monitoring may help patients with hypertension and stroke but did not improve blood pressure control for patients who had normal blood pressure at the start or those with disabilities, according to a randomized ...

Recommended for you

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

High-dose vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles for children

July 18, 2017
Giving children high doses of vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles, a new study has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.