Web learning improves nurses' triage skills

January 17, 2013
Web learning improves nurses' triage skills
Web-based learning is effective at standardizing training for triage skills of registered nurses, according to a review published in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

(HealthDay)—Web-based learning is effective at standardizing training for triage skills of registered nurses (RNs), according to a review published in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

James A. Rankin, R.N., Ph.D., from the University of Calgary in Canada, and colleagues randomized 132 RNs to an or control group. All RNs received the same content and learning activities, but the experimental group had a mandatory tutorial, received marks for online discussion, and completed a workplace project. Chart audits and interviews were used to assess data.

The researchers found that the Web course provided a standardized and effective that enhanced emergency nurses' triage accuracy. The experimental group's mandatory online tutorial, online discussion, and workplace project increased the RNs' preparation for online learning, and these interventions were successful in transferring triage learning to practice.

"Web learning can help professionals maintain competency and support professional practice," the authors write.

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