FSMB: Approaches explored for expediting multi-state licenses

February 4, 2013
FSMB: approaches explored for expediting multi-state licenses
New approaches are being explored for streamlining physician multi-state licensure to accommodate the use of telemedicine in the delivery of health care, according to a report from a meeting held from Jan. 16 to 17 by the Federation of State Medical Boards.

(HealthDay)—New approaches are being explored for streamlining physician multi-state licensure to accommodate the use of telemedicine in the delivery of health care, according to a report from a meeting held from Jan. 16 to 17 by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

The FSMB, a national non-profit organization representing the 70 medical boards within the United States and its territories, together with Administrators in Medicine, a national organization for state medical board executives, explored novel mechanisms to streamline current licensing processes for physicians and to accommodate the use of telemedicine and multi-state organizations in .

The speakers addressed the new opportunities and challenges for state-based medical licensure that have resulted from emerging medical technologies. State medical board representatives provided overviews of their work and suggested new mechanisms to accelerate licensure and enhance access to .

"The level of dialogue in exploring new approaches to streamline medical licensing processes was outstanding," Lance Talmage, M.D., the chair of the FSMB, said in a statement. "State medical boards continue to build on achieved in recent years to develop a robust system that makes it easier for physicians to get licensed in multiple states, while ensuring the safety and security of patients."

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