High risk of cardiovascular diseases amongst Swedish-born and immigrant MS patients

February 4, 2013

A new study from Karolinska Institutet shows that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) run a high risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure, regardless of migration background. According to principal investigator Tahereh Moradi, the study is the first in the world to examine the risk of cardiovascular diseases in male and female MS patients with both non-immigrant and immigrant backgrounds.

MS is a that breaks down the , and is the most common neurological cause of disability amongst young people. The study now published in the scientific periodical Multiple Sclerosis Journal examined over 8,000 between the years 1987 and 2009.

"It turns out that MS patients run a 85 per cent higher risk of , a 70 per cent higher risk of stroke, and a 100 per cent higher risk of , results that are consistent in both young and elderly patients, and patients born in and outside Sweden, with the effect being particularly noticeable for women," says principal investigator Dr Tahereh Moradi, Associate Professor at Karolinska Institutet's Institute of Environmental Medicine.

With MS striking two in every 10,000 people, primarily women, every year, Sweden has one of the highest rates of the disease in the world; and despite the rising incidence of MS across the globe, its etiology is still unknown.

"These kinds of study have important public health and clinical implications," says Dr Moradi. "They can help us to understand the causes of MS and whether they resemble those of cardiovascular diseases. The results indicate how important it is that against cardiovascular diseases are taken with MS patients, and that these patients, particularly the women, are kept under regular and careful observation."

The study was a joint initiative by Karolinska Institutet and Healthcare Provision, Stockholm County, and was conducted using the Migration and Health database, which is based on around a dozen national registers and designed for the study of diseases amongst socially disadvantaged groups, immigrants and children of immigrants in Sweden.

Explore further: Lower risk of breast cancer occurrence but higher mortality amongst low-educated and immigrant women

More information: Jadidi, E., Mohammadi, M. and Moradi, T. High Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases after Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis, Multiple Scleroisis Journal, online first 30 January 2013, doi: 10.1177/1352458513475833

Related Stories

Lower risk of breast cancer occurrence but higher mortality amongst low-educated and immigrant women

January 10, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Low-educated and immigrant women run a lower risk of breast cancer occurrence than highly educated women and women born in Sweden. However, the risk of dying from breast cancer is higher for those low-educated ...

Multiple sclerosis patients have lower risk of cancer: research

June 21, 2012
Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients appear to have a lower cancer risk, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health.

Shift work in teens linked to increased multiple sclerosis risk

October 18, 2011
Researchers from Sweden have uncovered an association between shift work and increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Those who engage in off-hour employment before the age of 20 may be at risk for MS due to a disruption ...

Vets with MS have higher prevalence of chronic diseases

March 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Male veterans with multiple sclerosis (MS) have an increased prevalence of chronic diseases compared with the general population and with veterans without MS, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in ...

Study finds pregnancy safe in multiple sclerosis

June 27, 2011
Canadian researchers have found that maternal multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally not associated with adverse delivery outcomes or risk to their offspring. Full findings now appear in Annals of Neurology, a journal published ...

Recommended for you

The neural codes for body movements

July 21, 2017
A small patch of neurons in the brain can encode the movements of many body parts, according to researchers in the laboratory of Caltech's Richard Andersen, James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience, Tianqiao and Chrissy ...

Faulty support cells disrupt communication in brains of people with schizophrenia

July 20, 2017
New research has identified the culprit behind the wiring problems in the brains of people with schizophrenia. When researchers transplanted human brain cells generated from individuals diagnosed with childhood-onset schizophrenia ...

Scientists reveal how patterns of brain activity direct specific body movements

July 20, 2017
New research by Columbia scientists offers fresh insight into how the brain tells the body to move, from simple behaviors like walking, to trained movements that may take years to master. The discovery in mice advances knowledge ...

Scientists discover combined sensory map for heat, humidity in fly brain

July 20, 2017
Northwestern University neuroscientists now can visualize how fruit flies sense and process humidity and temperature together through a "sensory map" within their brains, according to new research.

Team traces masculinization in mice to estrogen receptor in inhibitory neurons

July 20, 2017
Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have opened a black box in the brain whose contents explain one of the remarkable yet mysterious facts of life.

Speech language therapy delivered through the Internet leads to similar improvements as in-person treatment

July 20, 2017
Telerehabilitation helps healthcare professionals reach more patients in need, but some worry it doesn't offer the same quality of care as in-person treatment. This isn't the case, according to recent research by Baycrest.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.