Cardio risks need evaluation before prescribing statins

March 15, 2013
Cardio risks need evaluation before prescribing statins
Physicians may not adequately consider a patient's cardiovascular risk when prescribing statins as preventive therapy, according to a research letter published online March 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Physicians may not adequately consider a patient's cardiovascular risk when prescribing statins as preventive therapy, according to a research letter published online March 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Michael E. Johansen, M.D., from University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues anonymously surveyed 750 physicians selected randomly from a nationally representative sample of U.S. physicians from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. There were an equal number of family medicine, cardiology, and general internal medicine physicians in the sample. Six vignette-style questions involving patients without and different baseline risks were included in the survey, with vignette numbers three to six including patients who had attempted .

The researchers analyzed 202 usable, returned samples. They found in vignettes one and two that when a woman with diabetes had higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (120 versus 88 mg/dL), statin therapy was recommended significantly more often (94 versus 40.2 percent). In vignettes three and four, significantly more treated a low-risk (LDL-C level of 180 mg/dL) 40-year-old man with well-controlled hypertension (88.9 percent) compared with a low-risk 50-year-old women (73.5 percent). In vignettes five and six, with hypertensive, tobacco-using patients, similar treatment rates were recommended to a 75-year-old man (LDL-C level of 140 mg/dL) compared with a 50-year-old woman (LDL-C level of 145 mg/dL). There were no differences in responses by clinical specialty.

"Overall, our study suggests that physicians may not adequately consider a patient's when prescribing statins in primary prevention," the authors write.

Explore further: Greater drop in LDL seen with atorvastatin plus PCSK9 antibody

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Greater drop in LDL seen with atorvastatin plus PCSK9 antibody

November 2, 2012
(HealthDay)—Addition of the fully human serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 monoclonal antibody, SAR236553, to atorvastatin is associated with greater reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels ...

New medication increases HDL cholesterol and decreases LDL cholesterol levels

November 15, 2011
Among patients with sub-optimal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, use of the drug evacetrapib alone or in combination with statin medications was associated ...

Antibody injection lowers LDL, adding to effectiveness of statin therapy

March 26, 2012
A novel monoclonal antibody identified in a new study dramatically lowered circulating LDL cholesterol by 40 percent to 72 percent, a development with potential to provide a new option for patients who are resistant to cholesterol-lowering ...

Recommended for you

Researchers investigate the potential of spider silk protein for engineering artificial heart

August 18, 2017
Ever more people are suffering from cardiac insufficiency, despite significant advances in preventing and minimising damage to the heart. The main cause of reduced cardiac functionality lies in the irreversible loss of cardiac ...

Lasers used to detect risk of heart attack and stroke

August 18, 2017
Patients at risk of heart attacks and strokes may be spotted earlier thanks to a diagnosis tool that uses near-infrared light to identify high-risk arterial plaques, according to research carried out at WMG, University of ...

Cholesterol crystals are sure sign a heart attack may loom

August 17, 2017
A new Michigan State University study on 240 emergency room patients shows just how much of a role a person's cholesterol plays, when in a crystallized state, during a heart attack.

How Gata4 helps mend a broken heart

August 15, 2017
During a heart attack, blood stops flowing into the heart; starved for oxygen, part of the heart muscle dies. The heart muscle does not regenerate; instead it replaces dead tissue with scars made of cells called fibroblasts ...

Injectable tissue patch could help repair damaged organs

August 14, 2017
A team of U of T Engineering researchers is mending broken hearts with an expanding tissue bandage a little smaller than a postage stamp.

'Fat but fit' are at increased risk of heart disease

August 14, 2017
Carrying extra weight could raise your risk of heart attack by more than a quarter, even if you are otherwise healthy.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.