US study: Fewer dying in hospitals, more at home

March 27, 2013 by Mike Stobbe

Surveys show most Americans would rather die at home than in a hospital. Now, a new government study suggests more and more people getting their wish.

The researchers studied the deaths of patients admitted to a sampling of hospitals. They determined that hospital deaths accounted for 29 percent of U.S. deaths in 2010, down from more than 32 percent in 2000.

Meanwhile, other reports indicate deaths in the home grew from 23 percent to 27 percent over the decade. Deaths in nursing homes held steady at around 21 percent.

The released the figures Wednesday. said the growing availability of may be one factor for fewer hospital deaths.

Explore further: Hospital remains most common place of death for cancer patients in England

More information: CDC report: www.cdc.gov/nchs/

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Lurker2358
1 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2013
This happens for several reasons.

Hospitals do not diagnose anything, especially in the ER. Doctors don't know what they're doing. You tell an ER doctor or clinic doctor your symptoms, they just look at you puzzled and mostly ignore it, maybe do a CBC, EEG, or an X-ray if you're lucky. If those come back negative, they ignore your symptoms and send you home with little or no advise or treatment. Basically what the ER amounts to is give someone a pain pill or a shot of morphine, and wait for them to "feel" better, and then just get rid of them. Then send them the bill for about $5000 the next day, having done absolutely nothing for them.

This is how "medicine" is practiced today.

Veterinarians treat their patients better, and if they mistreated an animal, they'd get sued and sent to jail, and their patients can't even tell them the symptoms; they have to solve it entirely on their own.

"Doctors" at the Hospital do worse all the time and get away with it.
Lurker2358
1 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2013
Another reason is dying in a hospital, especially for diabetics, means you will spend the last few days or weeks of your life being hacked to pieces, as they amputate your arms and legs due to gangrene and MRSA infections which tend to finish of diabetics; which they got from the Hospital staff, by the way.

You went there with chest pain, and got MRSA and pneumonia from the STAFF, and then they cut off your arms and legs and pump you full of somebody else's blood.

Who wants to go out like that?

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