Pioneering polio surgeon Jacquelin Perry dies

March 15, 2013

(AP)—Dr. Jacquelin Perry, a world-renowned orthopedic surgeon who pioneered treatments to help polio patients regain movement, has died at age 94 in California.

Perry died Monday at her Downey home. Her death was announced by Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Downey, where she worked for nearly 60 years.

In the 1950s, Perry developed to help paralyzed polio patients regain some movement. Decades later, some returned with post-polio symptoms of pain and . Perry became an expert into their conditions.

Perry also was known as an expert in the human gait. Her research into helping people with walking difficulties led to practices that are still used.

The Los Angeles Times (lat.ms/16w1ZPV ) reports she had Parkinson's disease but still was treating patients shortly before her death.

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