Sheriff proposes ankle monitors for some seniors

March 20, 2013 by Brady Mccombs

(AP)—A northern Utah sheriff's office is floating a unique and unproven idea for keeping seniors with Alzheimer's disease and dementia safe: Give them ankle monitors normally used on criminals on house arrest or parole.

Davis County Deputy Sheriff Kevin Fielding says the monitors would allow deputies to quickly find a person who has wandered off. That would save lives and save taxpayer funds by avoiding time-consuming searches.

The monitors would be offered to residents at a cost of about $4 a day.

Alzheimer's Association officials commend the agency for working to keep people with dementia and Alzheimer's safe. But they say using the bulky ankle monitors is not a realistic solution because people won't want to wear them.

They say people are already reticent to wear tracking devices that look like bracelets and necklaces offered by private and some .

Explore further: A third of US seniors die with dementia, study finds

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