Tackling issues of sexuality among people with dementia

March 21, 2013
This is Dr. Cindy Jones. Credit: Griffith University

Managing the delicate issue of sexual expression amongst people with dementia is the focus of a new education resource produced by Griffith University researcher Dr Cindy Jones.

The first resource of its kind and the subject of funding from the Department of Health and Aging and Queensland Training and Study Centres (DTSC), Sexualities and Dementia: Education Resource for is aimed at assisting health professionals working across care settings.

Based on national and international literature and research by Dr Jones from Griffith's Centre for Health Practice Innovation, the free eLearning resource aims to increase awareness of intimacy, sexualities and specific to people with dementia and to guide their carers on how to better support them.

First resource of its kind to address the LGBTI community

It is also the first e-learning resource in Australia to include concerns and issues faced by non-heterosexual people with dementia, including those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI).

"It became apparent that there was a real gap in the education of health professionals regarding sexualities and dementia, with no other comprehensive resource which specifically addresses the needs of this group," says Dr Jones.

"Our research revealed that when presented with these challenging situations, interventions taken by health professionals are often quite reactive rather than proactive, with many staff simply not knowing what to do.

"The resource provides a framework to guide the development of policy and guidelines to address issues of sexual expression in care settings. There is also a facilitator guide providing workshop information for which 'train the trainer' education can be applied."

"The important message is that expression of sexuality is a part of life no matter what age we are and that older people with dementia therefore also need to be considered," says Dr Jones.

Meredith Gresham, Senior Dementia Consultant - Research & Design, HammondCare was part of the expert panel reviewing the new resource.

"The modules really produced thoughtful discussion. The conclusion points are fabulous. I would like to congratulate Dr Jones on the work," she said.

Explore further: Project highlights growing activism among people living with dementia

Related Stories

Project highlights growing activism among people living with dementia

September 18, 2012
A researcher at the University of Southampton in collaboration with an artist at the University of Bradford have developed a brand new educational resource for raising awareness about the 820,000 people in the UK currently ...

New website will assist people with dementia

November 9, 2012
Researchers from McMaster and the University of Waterloo have developed a new website to help those living with dementia navigate the journey.

Dementia patients need urgent support after diagnosis

November 1, 2012
There is an urgent need for support from outside the family after diagnosis of dementia according to a study led by researchers from the University of Hertfordshire.

Research paves way for non drug-based dementia treatments for 'behaviors that challenge' carers

February 15, 2012
Alternative therapies for dementia patients need to be researched and applied more consistently if they are to help care organisations improve the well-being of patients and reduce the number of antipsychotic drugs prescribed.

Detecting early dementia in Parkinson's disease

June 8, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Doctors will soon be able to identify the early stages of dementia in the 40 per cent of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients in Australia who later develop the illness.

Recommended for you

Lifestyle changes to stave off Alzheimer's? Hints, no proof

July 20, 2017
There are no proven ways to stave off Alzheimer's, but a new report raises the prospect that avoiding nine key risks starting in childhood just might delay or even prevent about a third of dementia cases around the world.

Blood test identifies key Alzheimer's marker

July 19, 2017
A new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that measures of amyloid beta in the blood have the potential to help identify people with altered levels of amyloid in their ...

Steering an enzyme's 'scissors' shows potential for stopping Alzheimer's disease

July 19, 2017
The old real estate adage about "location, location, location" might also apply to the biochemical genesis of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

Brain scans may change care for some people with memory loss

July 19, 2017
Does it really take an expensive brain scan to diagnose Alzheimer's? Not everybody needs one but new research suggests that for a surprising number of patients whose memory problems are hard to pin down, PET scans may lead ...

Can poor sleep boost odds for Alzheimer's?

July 18, 2017
(HealthDay)— Breathing problems during sleep may signal an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease, a trio of studies suggests.

Hearing is believing: Speech may be a clue to mental decline

July 17, 2017
Your speech may, um, help reveal if you're uh ... developing thinking problems. More pauses, filler words and other verbal changes might be an early sign of mental decline, which can lead to Alzheimer's disease, a study suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.