Technology could provide a solution to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, save lives

March 28, 2013
Medtric Biotech LLC founders Sean Connell and Jianming Li are developing a host of disinfectant and wound care products that could be effective against antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. The company received a $150,000 SBIR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation to continue development. Credit: Purdue Research Park photo

(Medical Xpress)—Through the misuse and overuse of antibiotics, several types of bacteria have become resistant to drugs that were designed to kill them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that some of these "superbugs" are linked to tens of thousands of deaths in the United States annually, including 14,000 for C. difficile and 19,000 for MRSA.

Technology developed by Purdue University researchers and commercialized through a Purdue Research Park-based firm could be effective against the increased number of antibiotic- of bacteria in the world.

Medtric Biotech LLC, based in the Purdue Research Park, is developing a suite of disinfectant and wound care products that have been shown to be effective against two of the deadliest superbugs: MRSA and VRE. Sean Connell, president and COO, said these and other bacteria are becoming a concern.

"In the United States, the number of deaths attributed to these antibiotic-resistant bacteria rises each year. We see the effects as friends and family members contract serious infections that require hospitalization and drastic treatments," he said. "Our technology has been developed as an alternative option to prevent infection and treat . The results from third-party laboratories are promising, and they continue to motivate our team to develop these products that could save lives."

Medtric Biotech will continue to develop its products through a $150,000 SBIR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation. The company also is eligible to receive an additional $30,000 Phase IB supplemental fund. Jianming Li, CSO and co-inventor of the technology, said receiving the grant is a significant milestone for the technology.

"The NSF SBIR grant is a competitive and meritorious award, and we are grateful to receive this funding," he said. "Besides the financial resources, the grant validates our commercialization strategy and can be further used to leverage support."

Explore further: New plasma jet gives 'cold' shoulder to 'superbugs'

Related Stories

New plasma jet gives 'cold' shoulder to 'superbugs'

October 3, 2012
Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have developed a new technique which has the potential to kill off hospital superbugs like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, C. difficile and MRSA.

Recommended for you

Phase 3 trial confirms superiority of tocilizumab to steroids for giant cell arteritis

July 26, 2017
A phase 3 clinical trial has confirmed that regular treatment with tocilizumab, an inhibitor of interleukin-6, successfully reduced both symptoms of and the need for high-dose steroid treatment for giant cell arteritis, the ...

A large-scale 'germ trap' solution for hospitals

July 26, 2017
When an infectious airborne illness strikes, some hospitals use negative pressure rooms to isolate and treat patients. These rooms use ventilation controls to keep germ-filled air contained rather than letting it circulate ...

Researchers report new system to study chronic hepatitis B

July 25, 2017
Scientists from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have successfully tested a cell-culture system that will allow researchers to perform laboratory-based studies of long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. ...

Male hepatitis B patients suffer worse liver ailments, regardless of lifestyle

July 25, 2017
Why men with hepatitis B remain more than twice as likely to develop severe liver disease than women remains a mystery, even after a study led by a recent Drexel University graduate took lifestyle choices and environments ...

Mind-body therapies immediately reduce unmanageable pain in hospital patients

July 25, 2017
Mindfulness training and hypnotic suggestion significantly reduced acute pain experienced by hospital patients, according to a new study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Research examines lung cell turnover as risk factor and target for treatment of influenza pneumonia

July 24, 2017
Influenza is a recurring global health threat that, according to the World Health Organization, is responsible for as many as 500,000 deaths every year, most due to influenza pneumonia, or viral pneumonia. Infection with ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.