Child's cancer often causes parents severe distress: study

April 2, 2013
Child's cancer often causes parents severe distress: study
Odds of recovery, pain and finances are major worries.

(HealthDay)—Many parents of children with advanced cancer have high to severe levels of psychological distress, a new study finds.

The study included 81 parents of children treated for advanced cancer at Boston Children's Hospital, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Seattle Children's Hospital between December 2004 and June 2009.

Assessments revealed that more than half of the parents had high levels of and 16 percent had severe levels.

Parents' levels of psychological distress were associated with their child's symptoms and suffering, financial problems, goals of cancer care and understanding of their child's prognosis.

Psychological distress was much lower among parents whose understanding of their child's prognosis matched the specific goals of , according to the study, which was published online April 1 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Efforts to make this match and to ease child suffering and financial problems could help reduce parents' psychological distress, concluded Dr. Abby Rosenberg, of Seattle Children's Hospital, and colleagues in a journal news release.

Explore further: Parent induces guilt, child shows distress

More information: The American Cancer Society offers advice for dealing with cancer in children.

Related Stories

Parent induces guilt, child shows distress

March 23, 2013
The use of guilt-inducing parenting in daily parent-child interaction causes children distress still evident on the next day, emerges from the study Parents, teachers, and children's learning (LIGHT) carried out by Kaisa ...

Most parents who get tested for breast cancer genes share results with their children

January 9, 2012
A new study has found that when parents get tested for breast cancer genes, many of them share their results with their children, even with those who are very young. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal ...

Middle-aged mothers and fathers only as happy as their least happy grown child, research shows

August 24, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Despite the fact that middle-aged parents are no longer responsible for their grown children, the parents' emotional well-being and life satisfaction remain linked to those children's successes and problems ...

Recommended for you

The effects of happiness and sadness on children's snack consumption

February 19, 2018
A University of Texas at Dallas psychologist has examined the preconceptions about the effects of emotions on children's eating habits, creating the framework for future studies of how dietary patterns evolve in early childhood.

Cycle of infant reflux signals a call to help mothers

February 14, 2018
Western Sydney University research has found that first-time mothers with mental health issues – in particular, maternal anxiety – are five times as likely to have their baby noted as having reflux when admitted to hospital.

Safe-sleep recommendations for infants have not reduced sudden deaths in newborns

February 14, 2018
An analysis of trends in sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) over the past two decades finds that the drop in such deaths that took place following release of the 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) "back to sleep" ...

Most children with sickle cell anemia not receiving key medication to stay healthy

February 13, 2018
One of the greatest health threats to children with sickle cell anemia is getting a dangerous bacterial infection—but most are not receiving a key medication to reduce the risk, a new study suggests.

Premature babies' low blood pressure puzzle explained

February 13, 2018
Scientists have discovered crucial new information about how a foetus develops which could explain why very premature babies suffer low blood pressure and other health problems.

Babies face higher SIDS risk in certain states

February 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) claims the lives of some 3,500 babies in the United States each year, but its toll is far heavier in some states than others, health officials report.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

bertibus
1 / 5 (2) Apr 03, 2013
And we needed a study to understand this?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.