Researchers call on physicians to urge newly diagnosed cancer patients to quit smoking

April 10, 2013 by Helen Dodson, Yale University
Researchers call on physicians to urge newly diagnosed cancer patients to quit smoking
Credit: Shutterstock

Yale Cancer Center experts in collaboration with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) are calling on physicians to routinely recommend that patients stop smoking after a diagnosis of cancer. Their call to action took place in a policy statement released at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013, in Washington, D.C.

A large body of research shows that continuing to smoke after a results in poorer outcomes and that stopping smoking can improve a patient's chance of survival. This is true not only for lung cancer but for many types of the disease.

According to the AACR, a survey of -designated cancer centers found that only 38% of the centers that responded even record patient smoking as a vital sign and less than half have staff dedicated to programs.

The AACR and Yale called for universal tobacco use assessment and documentation at every patient visit, whether it occurs in the community or in a clinical trial.

"We are extremely grateful to the AACR for taking a strong stand on this and urging all cancer physicians to do what we already do routinely at Yale—help cancer patients take back their lives and health from this destructive habit," said lung cancer expert Roy Herbst, M.D., chief of at Yale Cancer Center, and chair of the AACR subcommittee on tobacco and cancer.

"It is crucial that all oncologists in any setting both assess tobacco use and take ownership of ensuring that their patients receive appropriate treatment for their tobacco use," said Benjamin Toll, associate professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, director of the at Yale Cancer Center, and chair of the committee charged with writing the AACR policy statement.

Other authors of the policy statement are Thomas Brandon of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Ellen Gritz of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Graham Warren of the Hollings at the Medical University of South Carolina.

For the full statement, visit the website.

Explore further: AACR releases policy guidance on tobacco and cancer clinical trials

Related Stories

AACR releases policy guidance on tobacco and cancer clinical trials

April 10, 2013
An American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) statement calls on the oncology community to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation treatment for all cancer and cancer-screening patients and to evaluate tobacco as a ...

Many doctors do not provide tobacco cessation assistance to lung cancer patients

March 28, 2013
Physicians who care for lung cancer patients recognize the importance of tobacco cessation, but often do not provide cessation assistance to their patients according to a recent study published in the Journal of Thoracic ...

Smoking history not assessed in cancer trials, study finds

June 14, 2012
Cancer trials typically do not assess smoking history of participants even though studies have shown tobacco use has adverse effects on cancer treatments, researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Yale Cancer Center ...

Many people continue to smoke after being diagnosed with cancer

January 23, 2012
A new analysis has found that a substantial number of lung and colorectal cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, ...

Study recommends national standards for tobacco use treatment

April 17, 2012
A cancer diagnosis doesn’t automatically get people to stop smoking, but continuing to smoke shortens patients’ survival, increases their risk for a second tumor, and is associated with worse outcomes after cancer ...

Study shows smoking cessation more successful for cancer patients who quit before surgery

January 23, 2013
Lung and head and neck cancer patients who smoked before surgery are more likely to relapse than those who had quit before surgery, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers say. They found that smoking-relapse prevention interventions ...

Recommended for you

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

Researchers find a way to 'starve' cancer

January 18, 2018
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital ...

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus

January 17, 2018
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise ...

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

January 17, 2018
Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted—revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanoma

January 17, 2018
A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at ...

Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged sword

January 17, 2018
Researchers have discovered that killing cancer cells can actually have the unintended effect of fueling the proliferation of residual, living cancer cells, ultimately leading to aggressive tumor progression.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.