Young athletes urged to use face-protecting gear

April 20, 2013
Young athletes urged to use face-protecting gear
Mouth guards, helmets and face shields can save teeth and more, experts say.

(HealthDay)—Young athletes and their parents and coaches are being reminded of the importance of wearing mouth and face protection during recreational and organized sports.

In 2012, the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation predicted that more than 3 million teeth would be knocked out in youth sporting events that year. The foundation also said that athletes who don't wear mouth guards are 60 times more likely to suffer damage to their teeth.

A survey commissioned by the American Association of Orthodontists found that 67 percent of parents said their children did not wear a mouth guard during organized sports. It also found that most children said they do not wear a mouth guard during organized sports because they are not required to wear them, according to a news release from the .

Mouth guards not only save teeth, they also help protect jaws, according to the Academy for Sports Dentistry, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the American Association of Orthodontists, and the American Dental Association.

As part of National Facial Protection Month in April, the experts offer the following advice about mouth and face protection for athletes:

  • Always wear a mouth guard when playing . They are much less expensive than the cost to repair an injury.

  • Helmets are another important piece of safety equipment. They absorb the energy of an impact and help prevent damage to the head.

  • Use protective eyewear. The eyes are very vulnerable to injury when participating in sports.

  • A face shield can help prevent damage to the around the eyes, nose and jaw. Objects such as hockey pucks, basketballs and racquetballs can cause severe damage to players of any age.

Explore further: Sports and energy drinks responsible for irreversible damage to teeth

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about sports safety.

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rfw
3 / 5 (2) Apr 20, 2013
Helmets and face guards are UNNECESSARY if violence promoting activities are not engaged in. Football, Boxing and the like are thinly disguised and barely organized violence and do not belong in a peace promoting society.
Valentiinro
1 / 5 (1) Apr 21, 2013
Helmets and face guards are UNNECESSARY if violence promoting activities are not engaged in. Football, Boxing and the like are thinly disguised and barely organized violence and do not belong in a peace promoting society.


What peace promoting society are you claiming to belong to exactly?
rfw
not rated yet Apr 26, 2013
The International Society for Common Sense, Peaceful Co-Existence and Civil Behavior.
rfw
not rated yet May 01, 2013
Urge "young athletes" to keep their structural integrity intact by not engaging in contact "sports" (barely ritualized war).

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