Chiropractic therapy helps reduce acute low back pain

May 15, 2013
Chiropractic therapy helps reduce acute low back pain
Military personnel with acute lower back pain who receive chiropractic manipulative therapy in addition to standard medical care show significantly improved scores for pain relief and physical functioning, compared to those receiving only standard medical care, according to a study published in the April 15 issue of Spine.

(HealthDay)—Military personnel with acute lower back pain (LBP) who receive chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) in addition to standard medical care (SMC) show significantly improved scores for pain relief and physical functioning, compared to those receiving only SMC, according to a study published in the April 15 issue of Spine.

Christine M. Goertz, D.C., Ph.D., of the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research in Davenport, Iowa, and associates conducted a to assess changes in pain levels and physical functioning among 91 active-duty soldiers (86 percent male; 63 percent white) treated for LBP with SMC or with SMC plus CMT from February 2008 to June 2009.

The researchers found that the adjusted mean scores for back-related on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and scores on a the back pain functional scale were significantly better in the SMC plus CMT group (46 soldiers) at both weeks two and four of the study, compared to the SMC group (45 soldiers).

"The results of this trial suggest that CMT in conjunction with SMC offers a significant advantage for decreasing pain and improving physical functioning when compared with only standard care, for men and women between 18 and 35 years of age with acute LBP," the authors write.

Explore further: Motor control exercises successful in curbing back pain

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88HUX88
not rated yet May 15, 2013
but chiropractic isn't science is it?
neversaidit
not rated yet May 15, 2013
there are two kinds of "chiropractors". one kind is pretty much a massage/joint manipulation - no reason why this wouldn't help. second group is people thinking they can cure diseases using joint manipulation...

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