Eyelash extension adhesives may cause bad reactions

May 16, 2013
Eyelash extension adhesives may cause bad reactions
Infections and allergies from cosmetic procedure can damage eyes or cause swelling, loss of eyelashes.

(HealthDay)—For those who aren't born with long, fluttery eyelashes, cosmetic extensions can help achieve that often sought-after look. But eye experts warn that the adhesives used to apply these eyelash extensions can cause allergies and infections.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) warns that among the potential dangers associated with cosmetic eyelash extensions and the adhesives used to apply them are infections of the cornea and eyelid, permanent or temporary loss of eyelashes, and eyelid swelling.

The academy said that a recent Consumer Reports article details the cases of several patients who suffered infections and to -based adhesives used with eyelash extensions.

The AAO said consumers should use caution if they're considering eyelash extensions and offered the following advice:

  • Only go to an aesthetician who is certified and working at a reputable business.

  • Ensure that adequate and proper hygiene is practiced by the aesthetician.

  • Ask about the eyelash adhesive ingredients before getting the extensions applied.

People who develop an infection, allergic reaction or other irritation after using eyelash extensions or other eye products should immediately seek medical attention from an —a doctor who specializes in the treatment of eye conditions, the experts noted in an AAO news release.

Explore further: Overused ophthalmology tests, treatments identified

More information: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers tips for the safe use of eye cosmetics.

Related Stories

Overused ophthalmology tests, treatments identified

March 1, 2013
(HealthDay)—The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) is participating in the Choosing Wisely campaign and has identified five tests and treatments that may be overused.

Consider eye safety when toy shopping

December 22, 2012
(HealthDay)—When you're holiday shopping for toys, remember to think about eye safety.

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.