Gaps in health outcomes persist in English youth

May 31, 2013
Gaps in health outcomes persist in english youth
Despite a government program in England to reduce health inequalities, indicators for health outcomes in deprived youth did not improve between 1999 and 2009, according to research published online May 30 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

(HealthDay)—Despite a government program in England to reduce health inequalities, indicators for health outcomes in deprived youth did not improve between 1999 and 2009, according to research published online May 30 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Dougal S. Hargreaves, M.D., of the University College London Institute of Child Health, and colleagues performed a secondary analysis of data for participants aged 0 to 24 years in the Health Surveys for England conducted in 1999, 2004, 2006, and 2009. The four main outcome measures examined were self/parent-reported general health, presence of a longstanding illness, obesity, and smoking. Socioeconomic status was defined by tertiles for occupational class.

The researchers found that none of the indicators showed a decrease in absolute or relative inequality between 1999 and 2009. Among children aged 0 to 12 years, the relative risk for poor general health increased significantly, from 1.6 in 1999 to 3.9 in 2009 for the most-deprived versus the least-deprived tertiles. The absolute difference in prevalence of longstanding illness increased from 1.3 to 7.4 for 0- to 12-year-olds and from −5.9 to 3.1 for 13- to 24-year-olds. Among children aged 8 to 15 years, absolute inequality in having tried smoking increased significantly in the first half of the decade, then decreased in the second half. Among youth aged 16 to 24 years, the absolute inequality in smoking prevalence continued throughout the decade.

"Despite a coordinated government strategy to address health gaps between different , there was no reduction of inequality in health status and key risk factors in children and young people between 1999 and 2009; in fact, there was some evidence of increased inequality," the authors write.

Explore further: 1997 to 2011 saw increase in allergies among US children

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

1997 to 2011 saw increase in allergies among US children

May 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—For U.S. children aged younger than 18 years, the prevalence of allergies increased from 1997 to 2011, with age, race/ethnicity, and income all affecting the prevalence, according to a May data brief issued ...

Children's well-being report captures Australia's growing inequality

March 15, 2013
Around one in six Australian children live below the poverty line, according to a report released today by the Australian Research Alliance for Children & Youth (ARACY). While the rates have improved since the first such ...

Gaps in life expectancy between rich and poor set to increase over next 10 years

December 4, 2012
Health inequalities between England's richest and poorest areas have widened in the ten years between 1999 and 2008. Researchers warn, in a study published today in BMJ, that over the next ten years, we may experience smaller ...

Study finds strong link between income inequality and readmission risk, but not mortality

February 14, 2013
The authors estimate nearly 40,000 extra admissions to hospital as a result of income inequality over the three year study period.

Shocking disparities in child obesity now exist in New Zealand

December 13, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Public health researcher Professor Tony Blakely from the University of Otago, Wellington says the time for prevaricating about obesity is over with the release of latest child obesity figures by the Ministry ...

Schizophrenia linked to social inequality

December 14, 2012
Higher rates of schizophrenia in urban areas can be attributed to increased deprivation, increased population density and an increase in inequality within a neighbourhood, new research reveals. The research, led by the University ...

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.