Giving patients a HED-SMART head start

May 27, 2013, City University London

A paper co-authored by academics from City's School of Health Sciences was named among the top 10 best abstracts submitted to the prestigious European Renal Association and European Dialysis and Transplant Association's (ERA-EDTA) annual congress. The paper was one of more than 2,400 abstracts submitted for consideration by the expert international panel.

Dr Konstantina Griva, an Honorary Senior Visiting Research Fellow at City, was lead investigator on the paper entitled 'Short and long-term outcomes of the hemodialysis intervention randomised trial (HED-SMART) - a practical low intensity intervention to improve adherence and ' Hayley McBain, a Research Fellow at City also contributed.

For receiving hemodialysis it is vital that diet, fluid and medication recommendations are closely adhered to. However, the success of self management is often patchy and the importance of following the advice is not well understood.

The researchers examined the use of a HED-SMART intervention, a four session, group based, self management intervention on treatment adherence for patients on hemodialysis. They found the HED-SMART program had significant post-intervention improvements in both clinical markers and self-report adherence.

The ERA-EDTA is one of the fastest growing Medical Association whose purpose is to encourage and to report advances in the field of clinical nephrology, dialysis, renal transplantation and related subjects. Their annual conference is the world leading event for practitioners and researchers in the fields of clinical nephrology, hypertension, dialysis and .

Professor Stanton Newman, Dean of the School of Health Sciences and a co-author on the paper, said: "We are delighted that the we designed, based on our previous work, has proved successful for this patient group. Not only did it improve adherence to the complex regimen these patients have to follow but it also improved markers of the patients clinical status."

Explore further: Frequent dialysis poses risks for kidney disease patients

Related Stories

Frequent dialysis poses risks for kidney disease patients

February 7, 2013
Compared with standard dialysis, frequent dialysis can cause complications related to repeated access to the blood, requiring patients to undergo more repair procedures to the site through which blood is removed and returned, ...

There's no place like home—for dialysis

October 4, 2012
Most patients with chronic kidney disease who undergo hemodialysis put up with a grueling treatment regimen that involves going into a clinic several days a week and sitting through a three-to-four hour dialysis session at ...

Hemodiafiltration reduces risk of dying over the course of a 3-year study

February 21, 2013
A technique that removes additional toxins during dialysis may prolong kidney failure patients' lives, according to a clinical trial appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology. In light ...

Clinical support for patient self-management is rhetoric rather than reality

May 17, 2013
The processes to allow people to self-manage their own illness are not being used appropriately by health professionals to the benefit of their patients, new research suggests.

Does technique that removes additional toxins benefit dialysis patients?

April 26, 2012
A technique that removes additional toxins during dialysis does not improve kidney failure patients' survival or heart health, but intense treatments may provide a benefit, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue ...

Study examines telephone intervention in glaucoma treatment adherence

June 11, 2012
A telephone intervention trial was associated with improvement in glaucoma medication adherence in both the treatment group and the control group but, when the two groups were compared, interactive telephone calls and tailored ...

Recommended for you

New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD risk

January 16, 2018
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk ...

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic

January 16, 2018
While past exposure to influenza A viruses often builds immunity to similar, and sometimes different, strains of the virus, Canadian researchers are calling for more attention to exceptions to that rule.

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses

January 11, 2018
Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.