Toddlers from socially-deprived homes most at risk of scalds, study finds

May 9, 2013, University of Nottingham
Toddlers from socially-deprived homes most at risk of scalds, study finds

(Medical Xpress)—Toddlers living in socially-deprived areas are at the greatest risk of suffering a scald in the home, researchers at The University of Nottingham have found.

The study, published in the journal Burns, showed that boys aged between one and two years old and those with multiple siblings were statistically more likely to suffer a hot water-related injury, while born to mothers aged 40 years and over were at less risk than those with teenage .

The results could help GPs and Health Visitors identify those children most at risk of a scald and prevent injuries by targeting education and advice, referrals for checks and recommendations for safety equipment at those most in need.

Dr Elizabeth Orton, co-author of the study in the University's Division of Primary Care, said: "It would be impossible for this study to show the whole picture as there is some information on potential risk factors which is unavailable through primary care records. For example, how well are observed, such as cooking with pans on the rear cooker rings out of reach of children or ensuring that baths are always supervised while being filled.

"However, the results from our research offer significant insight into those groups who are at most risk, which would enable GPs to deliver targeted interventions to patients during and hopefully reduce the pain and misery of scalds for many children."

Scalds are a common injury in children, accounting for half of all burns in pre-school youngsters. They can cause terrible pain and need prolonged treatment, often leaving both physical and psychological scars. These types of injury also represent a significant to the NHS—the British Burn Association calculated that a serious scald needing could cost more than £170,000.

Most scalds are preventable and safety equipment such as thermostatic mixer valves for bath taps are both cost-effective and successful in reducing injury, however to date there has been a lack of information on groups most at risk to allow doctors to target accident prevention measures effectively.

The Nottingham researchers used information routinely collected by GP patient records to study children born between January 1988 and November 2004 and their mothers—a total of more than 180,000 mother-child pairs and 986 cases of scald injuries—to assess common factors among those who needed treatment after suffering a scald.

In the children they looked at the sex of the child and their age at the time of injury and the number of siblings. In their mothers they assessed age at childbirth, any history of depression during pregnancy or the first six months after the birth of their child and whether they drank alcohol to a harmful or hazardous extent.

They also looked at whether they lived in a deprived household, based on their postcode, and the number of adults living in the home.

They then compared them to a control group of children from a previous study exploring risk factors for childhood fractures, poisonings and thermal burns.

Their results showed that:

  • Boys were 34 per cent more likely to have a scald injury
  • Age played an important role in scalds—toddlers aged one to two years of age were two and a half times more likely to suffer a scald than a child under a year old
  • Children with multiple siblings had a higher chance of suffering a scald—3rd born children were twice as likely to be injured as first or 2nd born children
  • A decreased risk of scald to children with older mothers—with children born to mothers aged 30 to 40 years were 30 per cent less likely to suffer a scald than a child born to a mum aged under 20 and this increases to 70 per cent less likely if the mum is over 40
  • Children living in a single parent household are 26 per cent more likely to have a scald compared to children in two-parent households
  • Children living in deprived households are 80 per cent more likely to have a scald compared to those in the least deprived households

The paper, for Scald Injury in Children Under 5 Years of Age: A Case-Control Study Using Routinely Collected Data, is available online on the Burns website at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2013.03.022

Explore further: Home hot water temperatures remain a burn hazard for young and elderly

Related Stories

Home hot water temperatures remain a burn hazard for young and elderly

March 28, 2013
Home hot water heater temperatures are too high, warns a team of researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Despite the adoption of voluntary standards by manufacturers to preset hot water heater ...

Housing quality associated with children's burn injury risk

November 12, 2012
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy finds many children may be at heightened risk for fire and scald burns by virtue of living in substandard housing. Researchers surveyed ...

Advice needed for parents on risk of poisoning in toddlers, research says

December 3, 2012
GPs and other primary care professionals need to warn parents about safely storing medicines and other hazardous household products in an effort to cut the number of poisonings among pre-school children, a study has said.

Reducing the risk of burns at home

December 11, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Home is where most of us feel safest, but it's also where nearly 80 per cent of all burn injuries occur, new research shows.

Recommended for you

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

Your dishwasher is not as sterile as you think

January 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Your dishwasher may get those plates spotless, but it is also probably teeming with bacteria and fungus, a new study suggests.

Study reveals what sleep talkers have to say

January 12, 2018
A team of researchers with members from several institutions in France has conducted a study regarding sleep talking and has found that most sleep talking is not only negative in nature, but involves a large amount of swearing. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.