University partners with Sony to find cure for 'lazy eye'

May 8, 2013, University of Nottingham
University partners with Sony to find cure for 'lazy eye'

The University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, have been working with Sony Computer Entertainment Europe (SCEE) to develop special 3-D glasses and games to help treat children suffering from Lazy Eye.

(or ) affects the vision of around 3% of all children, and the traditional treatment for the condition involves patching the good eye for hundreds of hours.

The original idea for the new treatment was developed several years ago by Stephen Haworth, a consultant eye surgeon, working at the Queen's Medical Centre (QMC). A team was formed by the University and the Nottingham University Hospital Trust to work on the project, known as I-BiT, with funding from the Wellcome Trust.

Software engineers from SCEE are now supporting scientists and medics at the University and the QMC involved in I-BiT in their quest to further develop games as a novel and effective method for treating Lazy Eye.

SCEE has agreed to provide customised games for the I-BiT system, based on popular titles for the PlayStation®3 (PS3™) console. Children play the games wearing 3-D '' and the technology presents the game background to the good eye and the active content to the 'bad' eye, so both eyes are involved, resulting in a binocular treatment. However, the patient sees only the one, combined, image.

Speaking about the I-BiT system, Mr Alex Foss, Consultant Opthalmic surgeon at the Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham and the leader of the project, said: "The current technique of patching up the good eye isn't very effective, and children also dislike it, which means they are reluctant to comply, further reducing the levels of success.

"However, in cases that have so far been treated using the I-BiT system, a marked improvement has been seen after only a few half-hour sessions."

Simon Benson, Senior Development Manager at Europe, commented:

"Sony Computer Entertainment Europe is proud to be involved with helping to develop the I-BiT product with The University of Nottingham. The new PlayStation® based solution will actually make it enjoyable for children to undergo treatment.

"We are looking forward to continuing our work with the I-BiT Team and helping them make a product which will help to improve the eyesight of hundreds of thousands of young in Europe."

A clinical trial programme, funded by the Wellcome Trust, has now started. In parallel with these studies, it is intended that a more integrated system for commercial use will be developed, which, after testing will be made available through High Street optical outlets, hospital eye clinics and in the longer term, possibly directly into the home.

Sue Cobb, Associate Professor in Human Factors at The University of Nottingham, led the original research into the IBiT technology. She said: "The development of games and other technologies by Sony will take the I-BiT project to a new level. We are all very excited about the potential impact that this will have in improving the treatment of amblyopia."

Dr Alan Burbidge from The University of Nottingham's Business Engagement and Innovation Services team, who is the University's technology transfer manager for the project, added: "This is a great example of the University and the NHS working collaboratively together to solve an unmet clinical need."

Explore further: Kids with blocked tear ducts at higher risk for 'lazy eye'

Related Stories

Kids with blocked tear ducts at higher risk for 'lazy eye'

October 12, 2011
Amblyopia, sometimes referred to as "lazy eye," is a cause of poor vision in children. It occurs in about 1.6% to 3.6% of the general population. Early treatment is critical, as the first few years are the most important ...

Video games used in new treatment that may fix 'lazy eye' in older children

October 23, 2011
A new study conducted in an eye clinic in India found that correction of amblyopia, also called "lazy eye," can be achieved in many older children, if they stick to a regimen that includes playing video games along with standard ...

Lazy eye disorder: A promising new therapeutic approach

April 22, 2013
A research team led by Dr. Robert Hess from McGill University and the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has used the popular puzzle video game Tetris in an innovative approach to treat adult ...

Recommended for you

Study advances gene therapy for glaucoma

January 16, 2018
While testing genes to treat glaucoma by reducing pressure inside the eye, University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists stumbled onto a problem: They had trouble getting efficient gene delivery to the cells that act like drains ...

New study offers added hope for patients awaiting corneal transplants

January 9, 2018
New national research led by Jonathan Lass of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has found that corneal donor tissue can be safely stored for 11 days before transplantation surgery to correct eye problems ...

Diabetic blindness caused and reversed "trapped" immune cells in rodent retinas

January 3, 2018
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a cell signaling pathway in mice that triggers vision loss in patients with diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion – diseases characterized by the closure of blood vessels ...

Ophthalmologists increasingly dissatisfied with electronic health records

December 29, 2017
Ophthalmologists' use of electronic health records (EHR) systems for storing and accessing patients' medical histories more than doubled between 2006 and 2016, while their perceptions of financial and clinical productivity ...

Higher omega-3 fatty acid intake tied to lower glaucoma risk

December 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—Increased daily intake of ω-3 fatty acids is associated with lower odds of glaucoma, but higher levels of total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake are associated with higher odds of developing glaucoma, ...

Protein analysis allows for treatment of eye-disease symptoms with existing drugs

December 21, 2017
Demonstrating the potential of precision health, a team led by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine has matched existing drugs to errant proteins expressed by patients with a rare eye disease.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.