EHR improves coordination of care in hematuria work-up

June 14, 2013
EHR improves coordination of care in hematuria work-up
Care coordination, enhanced using an electronic health record system, can reduce the number of health care visits needed for the work-up of hematuria, according to a study published in the July issue of The Journal of Urology.

(HealthDay)—Care coordination, enhanced using an electronic health record system, can reduce the number of health care visits needed for the work-up of hematuria, according to a study published in the July issue of The Journal of Urology.

Jessica T. Casey, M.D., from Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues analyzed outcomes in 106 patients referred for microscopic and gross hematuria who were evaluated using Inflection Navigator, a protocol-based, electronic health record-enabled care coordination system developed to support evaluating newly discovered hematuria. Outcomes were compared to those of 105 patients referred to the same urology department for hematuria who were not evaluated using this system.

The researchers found that patients in the care coordination group completed the evaluation with significantly shorter time between referral and the completion of the imaging and cystoscopy components of the assessment (mean, 40.9 versus 74.1 days). Health care costs were potentially decreased using the system by significantly decreasing the mean number of urology visits needed to complete an evaluation, from 2.1 in the standard referral group to 1.6 in the care coordination group.

"A protocol-based care coordination system for hematuria decreased the time needed to complete an evaluation and decreased the number of overall visits required to make a final diagnosis," the authors write.

The Inflection Navigator is a project of the Szollosi Program, which partially funded the study.

Explore further: Diagnosis, treatment of common outpatient disorder adds $238 million a year in ER costs

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Diagnosis, treatment of common outpatient disorder adds $238 million a year in ER costs

May 5, 2013
A relatively common urinary tract disorder that can usually be managed in an outpatient setting is adding an estimated $238 million a year to the cost of emergency room visits in the U.S., according to two new studies from ...

New hematuria risk index IDs patients at low cancer risk

January 14, 2013
(HealthDay)—A Hematuria Risk Index could identify cancer risk among patients with asymptomatic microscopic hematuria, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Study finds routine tests done on patients with microscopic blood in urine can be avoided

January 9, 2013
The presence of microscopic hematuria – blood found in urine that can't be seen by the naked eye – does not necessarily indicate the presence of cancer, according to a Kaiser Permanente Southern California study published ...

Digital divide exists with physician EHR adoption

May 20, 2013
(HealthDay)—The majority of physicians remain reluctant to adopt health information technology (HIT), according to a report by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu.

Title V coverage varies across states for diabetes

May 10, 2013
(HealthDay)—There is significant state by state variation in Title V medical coverage for children with diabetes, according to a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

Multimodality approach needed to reengineer health care

February 20, 2013
(HealthDay)—A multimodality approach focusing on reengineering the U.S. health care system may provide a way to improve quality and reduce costs, according to a viewpoint published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of ...

Recommended for you

Sweet, bitter, fat: New study reveals impact of genetics on how kids snack

February 22, 2018
Whether your child asks for crackers, cookies or veggies to snack on could be linked to genetics, according to new findings from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph.

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

February 22, 2018
We all have that Facebook friend—or 10—who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.