Hepatitis A outbreak linked to Ore. berry farm

June 1, 2013 by Mary Clare Jalonick

(AP)—The Food and Drug Administration is investigating an outbreak of Hepatitis A linked to a frozen organic berry mix from a farm in Oregon.

The FDA said Friday that 30 illnesses are linked to Townsend Farms Organic Anti-Oxidant Blend, which contains pomegranate seed mix. Illnesses were reported in Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, and California.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that can last from a few weeks to a several months. It is spread when a person ingests, even in tiny amounts, contaminated fecal matter.

The FDA said it is inspecting the processing facilities of Townsend Farms of Fairview, Ore.

A illnesses occur within 15 to 50 days of exposure to the virus. Vaccination can prevent if given within two weeks of exposure.

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