New study looks at unintended costs of mandated infertility coverage

June 28, 2013 by Susan Guibert

The rate of triplet or higher-order multiple births increased by 26 percent between 1996 and 2002 in seven states mandating insurance coverage for infertility treatments, costing an additional $900 million in delivery costs alone, according to a new study by University of Notre Dame economist Kasey Buckles. The study will be published in the July issue of Health Economics.

That figure likely is an underestimate of the total costs induced by the mandates, since it does not include costs associated with triplet pregnancies, with treating the immediate and later-life complications associated with triplet births or costs from quadruplet and higher-order births, according to Buckles, who specializes in family and .

"These mandates have benefited many women by helping offset the huge costs of infertility treatments. But the mandates have also increased multiple in these states, and those births can be costly and risky," Buckles said.

Currently, the seven states with strong mandate-to-cover laws are Maryland, Arkansas, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Illinois and New Jersey.

The study finds that the laws in those states increased among women who are older, white, married and highly educated, with smaller increases among minority or less educated women, showing that a narrow cross section of the population benefits the most from the mandates.

"There is an ongoing debate about whether infertility treatments should be covered by insurance, so it is important to try to understand how coverage affects , and who the beneficiaries are," said Buckles.

Explore further: Public funding spurs couples to seek fertility treatment

More information: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hec.2850/full

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