Study says wiser medication use could cut health costs

June 19, 2013 by Linda A. Johnson

If doctors and patients used prescription drugs more wisely, they could save the U.S. health care system at least $213 billion a year, a study concludes.

The savings would come by reducing medication overuse, underuse and other flaws in care that cause complications and longer, more expensive treatments, researchers conclude.

The new findings by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics improve on numerous prior efforts to quantify the dollars wasted on health care.

Numerous experts previously have estimated that tens of billions, perhaps hundreds of billions of dollars, could be better used each year to improve patient care and outcomes and to slow down spending by government health programs, insurers and consumers.

Explore further: Billions can be saved with pharmacy benefit management

Related Stories

Billions can be saved with pharmacy benefit management

May 29, 2013
(HealthDay)—Efficient pharmacy benefit management, including increasing use of generic drugs and negotiation of market-based pharmacy dispensing fees, could save Medicaid programs billions of dollars nationwide in the next ...

Medicare beneficiaries substantially more likely to use brand-name drugs than VA patients

June 10, 2013
Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes are two to three times more likely to use expensive brand-name drugs than a comparable group of patients treated within the VA Healthcare System, according to a nationwide study by researchers ...

Understanding a heart patients' quality of life can improve outcomes

May 6, 2013
Completing a quality-of-life questionnaire at a healthcare provider's office could help patients live longer and live better, according to a new scientific statement published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart ...

Brazil slum study: Mobile health tech promising

May 8, 2013
(AP)—A study conducted in a Rio de Janeiro hillside slum says that using mobile health technology to monitor patients in poor urban areas could improve residents' access to health care while also reducing healthcare spending.

Slowdown in health care spending growth could save Americans $770 billion, study finds

May 6, 2013
A slowdown in the growth of U.S. health care costs could mean that Americans could save as much as $770 billion on Medicare spending over the next decade, Harvard economists say.

Diabetes care for African-Americans can be improved

April 1, 2013
(HealthDay)—For African-Americans with type 2 diabetes, health care-promoted interventions targeting patients, the health care system, or both, can improve the quality of care, according to a review and meta-analysis published ...

Recommended for you

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep—and caffeine

August 18, 2017
Sleep is essential for good mental and physical health, and chronic insufficient sleep increases the risk for several chronic health problems.

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, researchers find

August 17, 2017
A well-intentioned government regulation designed to offer healthier options in school vending machines has failed to instill better snacking habits in a sample of schools in Appalachian Virginia, according to a study by ...

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control

August 17, 2017
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.