An embolic agent in the rete mirabile induces ischemic stroke in miniature pigs

July 15, 2013
An embolic agent in the rete mirabile induces ischemic stroke in miniature pigs
Conventional MRI showed evidence of infarction foci in the basal ganglia of miniature pigs undergoing occlusion of the rete mirabile with sodium alginate microspheres for 1 week. Credit: Neural Regeneration Research

Rodents are frequently used as animal models for ischemic stroke studies induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion.

However, their anatomic structure is significantly different from humans. Thus, recent studies have focused on developing stroke models in large animals with similar anatomic structure as the human brain. The swine have several properties resembling the human brain, including brain volume and weight, quantity of cortical gyri and the percentage of white matter to gray matter. These properties allow evaluation of conventional cerebral imaging techniques and simulation of some surgical approaches.

Moreover, the swine is more cost-effective, easy to feed and obtain compared with non-human rodents, and are thus an ideal model. However, the abnormal capillary net at the branch of common carotid artery in swine makes it difficult to establish an model by occlusion via the common carotid artery.

According to a study in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 16, 2013), an ischemic stroke model was established successfully in the miniature pig by blocking the retia with sodium alginate microspheres. These findings indicate that sodium alginate microspheres are a suitable embolic material for blocking the skull base retia in miniature pigs to establish an ischemic stroke models.

This method challenges the concept that the swine cannot be used to establish models of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, and provides a stable and reliable model for studying pathogenesis, pathophysiologic changes, molecular biologic changes and development of safe and effective drugs for -induced brain ischemia.

Explore further: Results of the PROFI study reported at TCT 2011

More information: Cui YC, Tian Y, Tang Y, Jia LJ, Wu AL, Peng P, Yang JZ, Du H, Wang XJ, Wu LK. Application of sodium alginate microspheres in ischemic stroke modeling of miniature pigs. Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(16):1473-1480. www.sjzsyj.org:8080/Jweb_sjzs/ … ttachType=PDF&id=616

Related Stories

Results of the PROFI study reported at TCT 2011

November 12, 2011
Results from the PROFI study indicate that the use of a proximal balloon occlusion in carotid artery stenting lead to fewer cerebral ischemic lesions – a predictor of stroke – than with the use of a filter. Trial ...

Brain angioplasty and stents found safe and effective for stroke patients

December 11, 2012
Some stroke patients may benefit from cerebral angioplasty and stent placement, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

Activation of cortical type 2 cannabinoid receptors ameliorates ischemic brain injury

February 21, 2013
A new study published in the March issue of The American Journal of Pathology suggests that cortical type 2 cannabinoid (CB2) receptors might serve as potential therapeutic targets for cerebral ischemia.

Have a brain injury? You may be at higher risk for stroke

June 26, 2013
People who have a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be more likely to have a future stroke, according to research that appears in the June 26, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of ...

Carotid bypass surgery doesn't help cognitive performance after stroke

February 11, 2013
Surgery to bypass a blocked carotid artery in order to restore adequate blood flow to the brain does not improve cognitive performance in patients who've had a stroke or mini-stroke (TIA), according to research presented ...

Recommended for you

Some cancer therapies may provide a new way to treat high blood pressure

November 20, 2017
Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment ...

Could this protein protect people against coronary artery disease?

November 17, 2017
The buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries is an unfortunate part of aging. But by studying the genetic makeup of people who maintain clear arteries into old age, researchers led by UNC's Jonathan Schisler, PhD, have identified ...

Raising 'good' cholesterol fails to protect against heart disease

November 16, 2017
Raising so-called 'good' cholesterol by blocking a key protein involved in its metabolism does not protect against heart disease or stroke, according to a large genetic study of 150,000 Chinese adults published in the journal ...

Popular e-cigarette liquid flavorings may change, damage heart muscle cells

November 16, 2017
Chemicals used to make some popular e-cigarette liquid flavorings—including cinnamon, clove, citrus and floral—may cause changes or damage to heart muscle cells, new research indicates.

Possible use for botulinum toxin to treat atrial fibrillation

November 16, 2017
From temporarily softening wrinkles to easing migraines, botulinum toxin has become a versatile medical remedy because of its ability to block nerve signals that can become bothersome or risky.

New model estimates odds of events that trigger sudden cardiac death

November 16, 2017
A new computational model of heart tissue allows researchers to estimate the probability of rare heartbeat irregularities that can cause sudden cardiac death. The model, developed by Mark Walker and colleagues from Johns ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.