New research demonstrates an increase in NHS productivity

July 3, 2013

A new study by researchers at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York, reveals the productivity of the NHS in England increased by 3.2 per cent in the first year of the Coalition administration.

Researchers at CHE used the most detailed and comprehensive information available to measure growth in the amount of health care provided to NHS patients and in the total amount of resources (staff, equipment, etc) used to produce this care.

The research shows that NHS productivity has increased by 8 per cent since 2004/5. There have been year-on-year increases in the number of people receiving treatment and continued improvements in 30-day . Staff numbers have increased by almost 11per cent since 2004/5 but increases have flattened out recently. There has been pronounced growth in the use of other inputs over time.

Productivity growth of 3.2 per cent between 2009/10 and 2010/11 was driven mainly by a slowdown in staffing, with levels of activity being maintained.

Health Minister Lord Howe said: "NHS staff have risen to the challenge and worked hard to deliver this impressive improvement in productivity.

"It is testament to their commitment to patient care and a demonstration of the savings that can be achieved. However we must not be complacent and the NHS will need to ensure it is getting value for money from every pound it spends.

"With decision-making power now in the hands of doctors and nurses, we are confident that the NHS will change and evolve to meet the challenge of an and rising demand."

Professor Andrew Street, from the University's Centre for Health Economics, said: "2010/11 was the first year in which the scale of the 'Nicholson challenge' for 2011/12 to 2014/15 was made known to the NHS, with productivity improvements seen as key in delivering savings. The evidence suggests strong between 2009/10 and 2010/11, driven mainly by increased labour productivity."

Explore further: NHS productivity challenge would be 'undoable', says expert

Related Stories

NHS productivity challenge would be 'undoable', says expert

June 19, 2012
Asking the NHS to find nearly £50 billion in efficiency savings would be "frankly undoable" says John Appleby, Chief Economist at the King's Fund, in an article published on BMJ website today.

Survival of England's national health service questioned

June 24, 2013
(HealthDay)—Recent criticism of England's National Health Service (NHS) has called its survival into question, according to a perspective piece published online June 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

NHS consultant contract fails to increase productivity

December 14, 2012
An employment contract for NHS consultants introduced in 2003 and including a 27 per cent pay rise over three years failed to increase productivity. The findings emerge from a 10-year study of hospital consultant activity, ...

Declining health-care productivity in England: Who says so?

February 12, 2012
Reports that the National Health Service in England has been declining in productivity in the last decade appear to have been accepted as fact. However, a Viewpoint published Online First by The Lancet disputes this. The ...

Wales faces deepest NHS cuts of all UK countries

May 25, 2011
In Wales, the NHS is set for a real budget cut of nearly 11% over four years, while England escapes the deepest cuts across the four nations, according to John Appleby, Chief Economist at the King's Fund in the British Medical ...

One in five UK NHS staff report bullying by colleagues

July 1, 2013
One in five UK NHS staff report bullying by colleagues, with almost half saying they have witnessed bullying, in the past six months, indicates research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Recommended for you

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

App lets patients work alone or with others to prevent, monitor, and reverse chronic disease

July 24, 2017
Lack of patient adherence to treatment plans is a lingering, costly problem in the United States. But MIT Media Lab spinout Twine Health is proving that regular interventions from a patient's community of supporters can greatly ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.