Most popular ovarian cancer cell lines do not resemble ovarian cancer

July 15, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center recently discovered that the most frequently used cancer cell lines in ovarian cancer research are not suitable models of ovarian cancer. Their findings are the result of a detailed review of genomic data that recently became publicly available. Their methods, published in this week's Nature Communications, could provide a usable framework for other researchers to better assess cell lines' validity for future use in this and in other types of cancer research.

Computational biologists Nikolaus Schultz and Rileen Sinha, and biochemist Silvia Domcke, focused their review on high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), the most commonly diagnosed and frequently studied subtype of ovarian cancer. Using datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, which detail and define the genomic features of numerous clinical samples and cell lines, the team analyzed and then ranked several cell lines by their genomic similarities to tissue samples and, in doing so, uncovered multiple discrepencies between the cell lines and actual human tumors.

"Our review showed that the two most utilized cell lines, accounting for almost 60 percent of all published research studies, do not resemble HGSOC well at all," explained Dr. Schultz, the paper's lead author. "The problem with this is, investigators assumed they were studying high-grade serous , when in reality they were looking at something else. So conclusions drawn from this work might be misleading."

Cancer cell lines are generated and grown indefinitely in laboratories around the world, but are ultimately derived from human tumors. For the past several decades, they have been the most popular model for the study of cancer because they are inexpensive and easy to replicate. However, the origin of some cell lines is not well established, and through years in culture, they can acquire additional changes, making them less desirable.

"With the explosion of now at our fingertips and the potential for more to become available, it's our hope that this approach can be used by our colleagues to choose optimal cell lines, as we do expect similar discrepencies in other tumor types," said Dr. Schultz. "Overall, we believe these findings should greatly benefit the study of cancer."

Explore further: Resistance is futile: Researchers identify gene that mediates cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

Related Stories

Resistance is futile: Researchers identify gene that mediates cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

April 15, 2013
Platinum compounds, such as cisplatin and carboplatin, induce DNA cross-linking, prohibiting DNA synthesis and repair in rapidly dividing cells. They are first line therapeutics in the treatment of many solid tumors, but ...

Tools for better understanding breast cancer stem cells

June 4, 2013
A joint project between the Griffith University and the UQ Centre for clinical Research (UQCCR) has characterised an in vitro model that allows further studies on the breast cancer biology.

Mechanisms of acquired chemoresistance in ovarian cancer identified

August 15, 2012
The presence of multiple ovarian cancer genomes in an individual patient and the absence or downregulation of the gene LRP1B are associated with the development of chemoresistance in women with the high-grade serous cancer ...

Cisplatin-resistant cancer cells sensitive to experimental anticancer drugs, PARP inhibitors

April 3, 2013
Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors may be a novel treatment strategy for patients with cancer that has become resistant to the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin, according to data from a preclinical study published ...

New study highlights strong anti-cancer properties of soybeans

March 20, 2013
Soybean meal is a bi-product following oil extraction from soybean seeds. It is rich in protein, which usually makes up around 40% of the nutritional components of the seeds and dependent on the line, and can also contain ...

Scientists create method to personalize chemotherapy drug selection

February 14, 2013
In laboratory studies, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a way to personalize chemotherapy drug selection for cancer patients by using cell lines created from their own tumors.

Recommended for you

Researchers unravel novel mechanism by which tumors grow resistant to radiotherapy

November 23, 2017
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a key mechanism by which tumors develop resistance to radiation therapy and shown how such resistance might be overcome with drugs that are currently under development. The discovery ...

African Americans face highest risk for multiple myeloma yet underrepresented in research

November 23, 2017
Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent, according to a study ...

Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cells

November 22, 2017
Blocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, slowing their growth and making them easier to kill. This is the implication of a study led by researchers ...

One-size treatment for blood cancer probably doesn't fit all, researchers say

November 22, 2017
Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with a blood cancer called multiple myeloma, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent, according to a study ...

One in four U.S. seniors with cancer has had it before

November 22, 2017
(HealthDay)—For a quarter of American seniors, a cancer diagnosis signals the return of an old foe, new research shows.

Combination immunotherapy targets cancer resistance

November 22, 2017
Cancer immunotherapy drugs have had notable but limited success because in many cases, tumors develop resistance to treatment. But researchers at Yale and Stanford have identified an experimental antibody that overcomes this ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.