Rat hippocampal neurons: An executor of neuroinflammation

Rat hippocampal neurons: An executor of neuroinflammation
This image shows localization of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons by fluorescence microscopy. Cultured cells were stained with neuron-specific nuclear protein (neuronal nuclei; NeuN) to label neurons (red) or TLR4 (green). Almost all the cultured cells are NeuN/ TLR4-double positive. TLR4 was mostly expressed on the cell surface with limited staining in the cytoplasm. Credit: Neural Regeneration Research

Recent findings suggest that Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in the central nervous system, especially in glial cells, plays a vital role in neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative conditions. Traditional theory suggests that neurons are injured by inflammatory factors released from glial cells, and that neurons are the victims of neuroinflammation. However, it has recently been suggested that Toll-like receptor 4 is expressed by cerebral cortical neurons.

Yae Hu and team from Medical School of Nantong University found that lipopolysaccharide participates in neuroinflammation by stimulating Toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor-?B pathway in hippocampal neurons. Researchers believe that neurons may be both "passive victims" and "activators" of neuroinflammation.

These findings were published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 16, 2013).


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More information: Hu YE, Mao JH, Zhang Y, Zhou AL. Role of Toll-like receptor 4 in inflammatory reactions of hippocampal neurons. Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(16):1465-1472. www.sjzsyj.org:8080/Jweb_sjzs/ … ttachType=PDF&id=615
Provided by Neural Regeneration Research
Citation: Rat hippocampal neurons: An executor of neuroinflammation (2013, July 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-07-rat-hippocampal-neurons-executor-neuroinflammation.html
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